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PATRINGTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1834.

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"PATRINGTON, is a market and parish-town, having no dependent township, in the southern division of the wapentake of Holderness, East Riding, 186 miles from London, 109 e. by n. from Manchester, 53 s.e. from York, 15 s.s.e. from Hull, and 10 s.e. from Hedon. It is pleasantly situated within a mile and a half of the Humber, and about half a mile from Patrington Haven, up to which runs a small creek, called North Channel; by this means the export of corn and import of coal with other useful commodities are facilitated. According to record, this was once an excellent little port, but the embankment of Sunk Island has caused an accumulation of warp-land, which has prevented the access of all vessels but very small craft. The only structure worthy of notice is its church, which has a remarkable lofty spire, and serves mariners as a sea-mark for entering the Humber; it is dedicated to St. Patrick; the living is a rectory, in the gift of the master and fellows of Clare hall, Cambridge. The other places of worship are, a chapel each belonging to the Wesleyan and primitive methodists, and independents. The portion of Holderness district, in which this town is situated, is a rich agricultural country, famed for excellent beans and wheat, large cattle of the horned kind, excellent sheep, and the finest coach horses in England. The market is held on Saturday, for corn ; and the fairs on 28th March, for pedlary, shoes, &c., and 18th July and 6th December for pedlary. The population of the parish, by the parliamentary returns for 1821, was 1,244, and by those for 1831, 1,298. Sunk Island, which was an extra-parochial place, lies on the north side of the river Humber, and borders on the southern extremity of the lordships Patrington and Ottringham, from which places it is separated by a fence ditch, being the narrow remains of the north channel from Stone creek to Winestead Clough. It became a parish in July, 1830, (1st William 4th, cap. 59) and the church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, was consecrated, in the autumn of 1833, by the Archbishop of York. The King is the patron of the living, and the Rev. Robert Metcalf is the incumbent. This island has been gradually recovered from the Humber; rather more than a century ago it comprised only about 800 acres, but it now contains 6,000 of excellent warp-land belonging to the crown. The hon. commissioners of his Majesty's woods & forests, have recently admitted the farmers and cottagers, who live on the island, tenants under the crown. There are no tradesmen on the island with the exception of a wheelwright. Population at the last census, 242."

[Transcribed by Steve Garton ©2000 from
Pigot's directory (Yorkshire section) 1834]