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RICCALL: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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"RICCALL, a parish, partly in the liberty of St. Peter's, and partly in the wapentake of Ouse, East Riding county York, 10 miles S.E. of York, its post-town, 3½ N. of Escrick, and 5 N.W. of Selby. The village, which is considerable and well built, is situated on the river Ouse, and is wholly, agricultural. The soil is rich sand and warp upon a subsoil of clay. The and is partly in common, but the remainder is in a good state of cultivation, two-thirds being arable and one-third pasture, with about 40 acres of orchards and gardens. There are two manors, one belonging to the Bishop of Ripon, and the other to the Prebendary of Riccall, which has for more than two centuries been leased to the Wormley and Richardson families. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £508 10s., and the vicarial for £140. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of York, value £300, in the patronage of the archbishop. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is an ancient stone structure with a square embattled tower containing a clock and three bells. There are several monuments to the Richardson and Wormsley families. The parochial charities produce about £31 per annum. There is a parochial school for both sexes, partly supported by an endowment of £6. Riccall Hall, the seat of the Richardson family, is the principal residence. It is of red brick, and contains a collection of paintings. Wheel Hall, anciently the episcopal palace and the prebendal manorhouse, has been converted into farmhouses. On the common are the earthworks, called Daneshill, which were thrown up by the Danes and Northmen, who landed here in 1060, under Harold Harfager, king of Norway, upon the invitation of Tosti, Earl of Northumberland, but were defeated by Harold at Stanford bridge, when Harfager and Tosti were both slain."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013