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Help and advice for RUDSTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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RUDSTON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"RUDSTON, a parish in the wapentake of Dickering, East Riding county York, 5 miles W. of Bridlington, its post town. The village, which is small, is situated on the road to Sledmere, and is chiefly agricultural. Rudston is mentioned in Domesday Book as Rodestane, and is supposed to derive its name from a gritstone pillar in the churchyard, which resembles both in shape and substance the well-known stones called Devil's Arrows, near Boroughbridge. The breadth of the pillar is nearly 6 feet by 2 feet in thickness, and it rises 29 feet above ground, exclusively of a considerable portion buried in the ground. Its weight is assumed to be over 40 tons. The parish is large, including the hamlets of Caythorpe and Thorpe. The surface is boldly undulating, and the uplands embellished with thriving plantations. The soil is of a loamy and gravelly nature, upon a subsoil of limestone and gravel. Sir T. Syke's hounds meet in this parish. The vale is intersected by a stream, on the banks of which are luxuriant pastures. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment under an Enclosure Act in 1774. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of York, value £236, in the patronage of the archbishop. The church, dedicated to All Saints, is an ancient stone edifice, with a square tower containing three bells. It is situated on the brow of a bill, and contains a piscina and sedilia, also a font of great antiquity. There are several marble tablets and two old brasses. There is also a parochial school for both sexes, and at which a Sunday-school is also held. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have each a place of worship. Sir H. Boynton, Bart., is lord of the manor. Thorpe Hall is the principal residence. While enlarging the fishponds in the grounds of this mansion, in 1830, some Roman relics, consisting of urns, swords, and spurs, were discovered."


"CAYTHORPE, a hamlet in the parish of Rudston, in the East Riding of the county of York, 3 miles N. E. of Great Driffield."


"THORPE, a hamlet in the parish of Rudston, East Riding county York, 4 miles W. of Bridlington."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013