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Help and advice for RIPON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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RIPON: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"RIPON, a parish, market town, municipal and parliamentary borough, and seat of a bishopric, in the liberty of Ripon, West Riding county York, 22 miles N.W. of York, and 21½ from London by the Great Northern Railway, or 212 by road. The parish, which is very extensive, comprising between 49,000 and 50,000 acres, is situated on the right bank of the river Ure. The soil is for the most part gravelly, and the land is fertile around the city, but in some parts it is hilly and bleak. The first mention of Ripon occurs about the middle of the 7th century, when Eata, Abbot of Melrose, is said to have founded a monastery, at which time there were not more than thirty houses. A few years afterwards it was given to Wilfrid, who added considerably to the town, and made it a bishop's see. Alfred the Great made it a borough about the year 885. During the following two centuries it was destroyed three times, having been burnt twice by the Danes and laid waste by William the Norman soon after the Conquest. It was again twice burnt by Bruce between 1319 and 1323. When the plague raged in London in the reign of Henry IV. the king took up his residence at Ripon. James I. also visited this city, as did Charles I., on two occasions, and it was here that the Scots negotiated for a peace in 1640. It was subsequently occupied for a time by the parliamentarian troops, but was retaken in 1643 by the royalists under Sir John Mallory. In accordance with a custom instituted by King Alfred, three blasts of the horn are given at the door of the mayoralty every evening at nine o'clock by the official horn-blower, and a fourth at the market cross. The origin of this custom was to give warning against thieves, and the bugler was at that time called the "wakeman." -The municipal and parliamentary boundaries are co-extensive, comprising the ancient borough of Ripon, with the townships of Aismunderby and Bondgate, which form part of the parish of Ripon, and together contain 1,549 acres. The population in 1851 was 6,080, with 1,345 inhabited houses, which in 1861 had increased to 6,172. The streets generally are irregular, but they are well paved, lighted with gas, and there is a good supply of water. No especial branch of manufacture is now carried on in the city, but woollen cloth used to be made in large quantities before the days of Elizabeth, and spurs were then made in such quantities, and of such good quality, that "as true steel as Ripon rowels" became a proverb throughout England to denote honesty and courage. Davenant, in his "Wits," as well as Ben Jonson in his "Staple of News," make mention of sharp Ripon spurs. The manufacture of saddle trees is still carried on to a certain extent, together with that of buttons and hardware. There are some iron and brass foundries, engine works, several flour mills, and varnish manufactories, and tanning, and malting. The borough returns two members to parliament since the reign of Edward VI., and once in that of Edward I. It was first chartered by James I., and under the new Act is governed by a mayor, who is the returning officer, four aldermen, and twelve councillors, with the style of "mayor, burgesses, and commonalty of the borough of Ripon." The corporation revenue is about £250 per annum. A bridge of seventeen arches crosses the river Ure, the navigation of which was brought into the city through a canal constructed in 1768. The townhall was built in 1800 by Wyatt, the architect, at the sole expense of Mrs. Allanson, of Studley. It contains assembly rooms, and rooms where the magistrates hold their sittings. The mechanics' institute was completed in 1849. The market-place is a large square, in the centre of which is an obelisk 90 feet high, surmounted by the arms of Ripon, a bugle horn and a spur rowel, erected in 1780 by the then member-for Ripon, William Aislabie. The other public buildings are a dispensary and house of recovery, borough gaol, house of correction, gas and waterworks, theatre or riding school, four banks, and a savings-bank. The union workhouse was built in 1854. The cathedral of SS. Peter and Wilfrid is one of the best proportioned churches in England. It was originally built on the site of St. Wilfrid's abbey, in the reign of King Egfrid, about the year 680, but the present edifice was not commenced before 1330, and not wholly completed until the end of the 15th century. Almost every style of architecture may be traced in this structure. Its entire length from E. to W. is 266 feet, the transept is 130 feet long, the nave is 86 feet broad, and the choir and aisles 67 feet. At the western extremity are two towers, each 110 feet high; and there is besides the great tower called St. Wilfrid's Tower, containing a peal of eight bells. The crypt is of the Saxon period, and contains a large quantity of human remains in good preservation. The E. window is 50 feet by 25 feet, of stained glass, with armorial and other devices. The altar-piece is Grecian, and there are also portraits on wood of many of the kings of England from Edward III. to James I., besides many ancient and curiously-wrought monuments. The bishopric of Ripon was first erected in 1836 in accordance with an Act of Parliament, and the then head master of Harrow, the Rev. C. T. Longley, was consecrated the first bishop. The Bishop's Palace, a stone building in the Tudor style, about a mile from the city, was completed in 1839. The diocese is in the province of York, and includes the greater part of the West Riding, as well as Richmondshire in the North Riding. Thechapter consists of the dean, two archdeacons, four canons, a chancellor, and two minor canons. The living of the Holy Trinity is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £300, in the patronage of Simeon's Trustees. The church was built in 1825 at the cost of £13,000. It is cruciform, and in the early English style of architecture, with a spire 136 feet high. The organ is beautiful, and there are sittings for 700 persons. There are also the following district churches, viz: Aldfield-with-Studley, Bishop-Monkton, Bishop-Thornton, Dacre, Greenhow Hill, Markington, Pateley-Bridge, Sawley, Sharow, Skelton, North Stainley, and Winksley in conjunction with Grantley, the livings of which are all perpetual curacies, varying in value from £300 to £72. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive Methodists, New Connexion Methodists, Wesleyans, and Roman Catholics. The free grammar school was founded by King Edward VI., and incorporated by his sister, Queen Mary; the endowment produces an income of about £600 a year. There are also a blue-coat school, infant and National schools, and a Wesleyan elementary school, and a large training college for mistresses in connection with the dioceses of York and Ripon. The charities, or hospitals, as they are termed, are numerous; foremost among these is St. Mary Magdalene's Hospital, founded about 1344; the alms-houses were rebuilt in the reign of Charles II.; that of St. John the Baptist is also of ancient date, and St. Anne's dates from the time of Edward IV., and was founded by a Neville. A public bath-house, supplied from St. Wilfrid's Well, was erected in 1813; there is also another excellent spring called St. Helen's Well. Saxon coins and remains have been found at Ripon. Fountains Abbey, atStudley, about 3 miles off, is the seat of Earl de Grey, who admits visitors to his park and pleasure grounds every day except Sunday. Ripon used formerly to be noted for breeding horses, and the principal street is still called the horse fair. Races take place annually on the feast of St. Wilfrid in August. Market day is Thursday. Fairs are held on the last Thursday in January, 13th and 14th May, first Thursday and Friday in June, first Thursday in October and November, and on the 23rd November for hiring farm servants."


"AISMUNDERBY, a township united with Bondgate, in the liberty and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, near the city of Ripon."


"ALDFIELD, a township in the parish of Ripon, and wapentake of Clare, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles to the S.W. of Ripon. It is situated on a branch of the river Ure, in the midst of beautiful scenery. There is a mineral spring in the village impregnated with sulphur, and much resorted to. The living is a curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value with that of Studley, £72, in the patronage of Earl de Grey, of Studley Park."


"BEWERLEY, a township in the parish of Ripon, wapentake of Clare, in the West Riding of the county of York, 11 miles to the W. of Ripon. It is situated on the banks of the river Nidd, near Pateley Bridge, and includes the village of Greenhow Hill. Extensive lead mines are worked here, and give employment to many of the inhabitants. The chief residence is Bewerley Hall."


"BISHOP MONKTON, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles to the S.E. of Ripon. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £100, in the patronage of the dean and chapter."


"BISHOP THORNTON, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles from Ripon. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £95, in the gift of the dean and chapter."


"BISHOPSIDE, (High and Low) a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, 11 miles to the S.W. of Ripon. It is situated on the river Nidd, near its source, and includes the chapelry of Pateley Bridge, and several hamlets The charitable endowments of the township amount to £36 per annum."


"BISHOPTON, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, not far from Ripon."


"BONDGATE, a township joined with Aismunderby, in the liberty and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, close to Ripon."


"BRIDGE HEWICK, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, near Ripon."


"CLOTHERHOLME, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the N. W. of Ripon, its post town."


"COPTHEWICK, a township in the parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York. It is situated near Hewick Bridge."


"COWBUSH, a hamlet in the township of Sawley and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, 4 miles S.W. of Ripon."


"DACRE, a township in the parish of Ripon, lower division of the wapentake of Claro, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3½ miles S.E. of Pateley Bridge, and 10 S.W. of Ripon. It is situated on the river Nidd. A considerable linen manufacture is carried on here, and there are several lead-mines in the vicinity. The living is a perpetual curacy" in the diocese of Ripon, value £100, in the patronage of the bishop. The church is a stone edifice, erected in 1837, and contains 500 sittings, 400 of which are free. The charities amount to £12 per annum. The Wesleyans have a chapel and schools. There is also an endowed school for both sexes. The Rev. Henry Ingleby is lord of the manor."


"DOLEBANK, a hamlet in the chapelry of Bishop Thornton and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding of the county of York, near Ripon."


"EAVESTONE, a township in the parish of Ripon, West Riding, county York, 6 miles S.W. of Ripon. Lord Grantley is lord of the manor."


"FELL BECK, a hamlet in the parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 3 miles N.E. of Pateley Bridge."


"GILLMOOR, a hamlet in the chapelry of Bishop-Thornton, liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 3 miles N. of Ripley, and 2 S.W. of Ripon."


"GIVENDALE, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York. It is situated in the vicinity of the river Ure, about 2 miles S.E. of Ripon, its post town."


"GRANTLEY, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 5 miles W. of Ripon, its post town. It includes the hamlets of Lower Grantley and Redmires. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of -Ripon, value £65, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Ripon. There is a day school for children of both sexes, endowed with land producing £10 per annum. Lord Grantley is lord of the manor, whose seat is Grantley Hall in this township."


"GREENHOW HILL, a village in the parish of Ripon, West Riding county York. It is situated in the neighbourhood of Pateley Bridge."


"HEWICK BRIDGE, (and Copt Hewick), townships in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 2 miles E. of Ripon."


"HUNGATE, a hamlet in the township of Sawley, and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 4 miles S.W. of Ripon."


"INGERTHORPE, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.E. of Ripon."


"LINDRICK, a township in the parish of Ripon, lower division of the wapentake of Claro, West Riding county York, 3 miles W. of Ripon. It is a small township consisting of two large farms, and bounding Studley Park on the N. and W. Its name, formerly pronounced Linerigg, is said to have been derived from a strip of land designated "Roman Rigg," and near to which a gold ring was found in 1820. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £8 10s. In a field called "Yattsgarth" are ruins of an ancient village, supposed to be one of the lost Studleys."


"LITTLETHORPE, a hamlet in the township of Whitcliffe-with-Thorpe, parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 2 miles S. of Ripon. It is near the bank of the river Ure."


"MARKINGTON WITH WALLERTHWAITE, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 6 miles S.W. of Ripon, its post town, and 1 mile W. of Wormal Green station on the North-Eastern railway. The village, which is small, is situated on the river Nidd. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in agriculture. Agricultural machines are manufactured in this township, and lime-burning is carried on. The soil is clay. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £169, in the patronage of the bishop. The church, dedicated to St. Michael the Archangel, is a neat stone structure, with a belfry containing two bells. The charities produce about £7 per annum. There is an endowed Church school for both sexes, and a place of worship for the Wesleyans. William Wilberforce, Esq., is lord of the manor."


"MULWITH, a hamlet in the liberty and parish of Ripon, in the West Riding county York, 2 miles W. of Boroughbridge, and 4 S.E. of Ripon. It is situated on the N. bank of the river Ure, and is joined with Newby to form a township. Newby Hall is the principal residence."


"NEWBY, a hamlet in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 3½ miles S.E. of Ripon, and 3 W. of Boroughbridge. It is situated on the N. side of the river Ure, which occasionally inundates the adjacent lands. The manor formerly belonged to the Blackets, and constitutes a township with Mulwith, which latter is now a farm. Newby Hall, the principal residence, was built by Sir Edward Blacket from a design by Sir Christopher Wren."


"NORTH STAINLEY, (or Stainley-with-sleningford), a township in the parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 4 miles N.W. of Ripon, its post town. The village, which is small, is situated on the S. bank of the river Ure, and near the Roman way to Catterick. The township contains the new palace of the bishops of Ripon, recently erected on the farm of Bramley Grange. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £100, in the patronage of the dean and chapter. The church is modern."


"NUNWICK, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 2 miles N.E. of Ripon. It is situated near the river Ure. Here was formerly a circle surrounded by five stones, each 8 feet high and 20 in girth. It is joined with the hamlet of Howgrave to form a township."


"PASTURES NORTH, a hamlet in the township of Sawley and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 4 miles N. of Ripley."


"PATELEY BRIDGE, a chapelry and market town in the township of Bishopside, liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 12 miles W. by S. of Ripon, and 28 W. by N. of York. It is the terminus of the Nidd Valley branch of the North-Eastern railway. The town, which is situated on the slope of a hill, forms one continuous street, declining steeply towards the northern bank of the river Nidd. It contains a mechanics' institute, with reading-room and library attached. It had a market granted by Edward II. in 1324, but first rose into importance in connection with the adjacent lead mines, which, though now partially exhausted, were formerly worked to a very great extent. Since the decline of mining operations, flax spinning-mills and brewing have been successfully established. In the vicinity are quarries of excellent freestone, from which a great quantity of flags and landing stones are obtained. The land in the vicinity is chiefly used for grazing purposes. The extensive tract of common, known as the High and Low Bishopside Moor, has recently been enclosed under the superintendence of G. H. Strafford, Esq., and will afford much employment to the labouring population. It is a polling-place for the West Riding, and the head of a Poor-law Union, comprising eleven townships. It is also the seat of a superintendent registry district, but is included in the Ripon new county-court district. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Ripon, value £300, in the patronage of the dean and chapter. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, has a square tower containing one bell. It was erected in 1827 by a grant of £2,000 from the Parliamentary Commissioners, and the like sum raised by local subscriptions. The old church of St. Cuthbert has just been restored for a burial chapel. The register commences in 1652. There are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists. There is an endowed free school for boys, called Rake's school from the site of ground on which it stands, also a Sunday-school, which is held at the church. At Stump dross, in this township, a series of extensive caverns, lined with stalactites and stalagmites, were discovered in 1860, at the depth of 9 fathoms, and are described as having the appearance of a palace of jewels, from the great variety of colour and brilliancy of the crystals. Market day is Saturday, there being a good show of sheep and cattle every fortnight. Fairs are held on Easter and Whitsun eves, May 11th, September 17th, Monday after October 10th, and on Christmas Eve."


"RAIKES, a hamlet in the chapelry of High and Low Bishopside, parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, near Pateley Bridge. It is situated on the river Nidd."


"RAVENTOFTS, a hamlet in the chapelry of Bishop Thornton and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 3 miles N.W. of Ripley."


"SAWLEY, a township and chapelry in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 5 miles S.W. of Ripon, its post town. The village, which is of small extent, is chiefly agricultural. The township comprises the hamlets of Cowbush, Hungate, North Pastures, and Rispleth. The surface is broken by hills, which in some places attain a considerable elevation. The soil on the uplands is light, but in the valleys a heavy loam. About one-third of the land is arable, the remainder hilly pasture. There are quarries of good building-stone, from which materials were obtained for the erection of Trinity church, at Ripon. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £63, in the patronage of the dean and chapter. The church, dedicated to St. Michael, has a belfry containing one bell. The parochial charities produce about £14 per annum. There is a school for both sexes, partially endowed. Sawley Hall is the principal residence. H. Wormald, Esq., is lord of the manor and principal landowner."


"SHAROW, a township and ecclesiastical district in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 1½ mile N.E. of Ripon, its post town. The village, which is of small extent, is situated on an eminence near the river Ure, and within easy access of the Ripon railway station. The township includes the hamlets of Cowbush, Hungate, North Pastures, and Risplith. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in agriculture. The soil is of a sandy nature, upon a subsoil of red clay and rock. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £63, in the patronage of the dean and chapter. The church, dedicated to St. John, has a square tower containing six bells. There is a Church of England school for both sexes, in which a Sunday-school is also held. The Archbishop of York is lord of the manor."


"SHAW MILL, a hamlet in the chapelry of Bishop Thornton, liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 3 miles N.W. of Ripley."


"SKELDING, a township in the parish of Ripon, lower division of Claro wapentake, West Riding county York, 6 miles S.W. of Ripon, on the river Skell."


"SKELTON, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 4 miles S.E. of Ripon, its post town, and 2½ N.W. of Boroughbridge. The village, which is of small extent, is situated on the river Bure, and is wholly agricultural. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Ripon, value £90, in the patronage of the dean and chapter. The parochial charities produce about £1 per annum. There is a National school for both sexes."


"SLENINGFORD, a hamlet in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 5 miles N.W. of Ripon, its post town. It is situated at a ford on the river Ure. It is in conjunction with North Stainley to form a township."


"SMELT HOUSE, a hamlet in the township of Bishopside and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, near Pateley Bridge."


"STUDLEY ROGER, a township in the parish of Ripon, lower division of Claro wapentake, West Riding county York, 1½ mile S.W. of Ripon."


"STUDLEY ROYAL, a township in the parish of Ripon, lower division of Claro wapentake, West Riding county York, 2½ miles W. of Ripon. The principal residence is Studley Hall, containing portraits of Bacon, Lady Jane Grey, Peter the Great, and others. The park and grounds contain the Fountain Abbey, rotunda, banqueting room, &c., which during the summer months are open to the public. It is the property of Earl de Grey and Ripon."


"SUTTON GRANGE, a township in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 3 miles N.W. of Ripon. The grange is now a farmhouse."


"THORPE, a hamlet in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 1½ mile S.E. of Ripon. It is joined with Whitcliffe to form a township."


"WALLERSTHWAITE, a hamlet in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 3½ miles N.E. of Ripley. It is joined with Markington."


"WARSILL, an extra-parochial place in the liberty and parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 5 miles N.W. of Ripley, and 4 E. of Pateley Bridge. The Wesleyans have a chapel. J. Greenwood, Esq., is lord of the manor and principal landowner."


"WESTWICK, a township in the parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Boroughbridge, and 4 S.E. of Ripon, on the river Ure."


"WHITCLIFFE, a township in the parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 1 mile S.W. of Ripon. It contains the hundreds of Thorpe and Little Thorpe."


"WHITEHOUSES, a hamlet in the chapelry of Bishopside, parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 2 miles from Pateley-Bridge, on the river Nidd."


"WILSILL, a hamlet in the township of Bishopside, parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 2 miles S.E. of Pateley Bridge, on the river Nidd."


"WINKSLEY, a township in the parish of Ripon, West Riding county York, 4 miles W. of Ripon, on a branch of the river Ure."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013