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Kilgarriff

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KILGARRIFFE, a parish, partly in the barony of IBANE and BARRYROE, but chiefly in the Eastern Division of the barony of EAST-CARBERY, county of CORK, and province of MUNSTER; containing, with the post-town of Clonakilty, 6273 inhabitants. It is situated on the shores of the harbour of Clonakilty, and comprises 4581 statute acres, of which 4070 are applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £3640 per annum. The greater portion is under tillage, and there are some tracts of good pasture; the soil, though light and in some parts intermixed with rocks that rise above the surface, is generally fertile, and the system of agriculture is improved, though the old heavy plough is still in use. Near the town and at Crohane, in the northern part of the parish, are about 500 acres of bog. There are several quarries of blue slate on the lands of the Earl of Shannon, and indications of copper may be seen in various parts. The scenery is pleasingly varied, and along the coast are lofty cliffs. The principal seats are Ballydevane House, that of M. Becher, Esq.; Kilgarriffe House, of Capt. Davis; Fern Hill, of W. F. Atkin, Esq.; Taunies Cottage, of the Rev. Dr. Stewart; Ballyduvane, of E. Herrick, Esq.; and the Cottage of M. Gahvay, Esq. The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Ross, united to those of Desert and Island, forming the union of Kilgarriffe, in the patronage of the Bishop; the rectory is impropriate in Michael Roberts and Thos. W. Foot, Esqrs. The tithes amount to £430, of which £215 is payable to the impropriators, and the remainder to the vicar; and the entire tithes of the union, including the prebend, of Island, with which it is held, amount to £510. The church is at Clonakilty, which see. There is no glebe-house, but a glebe of three acres. In the R. C. divisions the parish is the head of the union or district of Clonakilty, comprising also the parishes of Kilnagross, Templeomalus, and Carrigrohane- More, and parts of Inchidony and Kilkerran-More; there is a spacious chapel at Clonakilty, and one on the lands of Donay, in Templeomalus. There is also a place of worship in the town for Wesleyan Methodists. About 600 children are taught in four public schools, of which the parochial schools and also an infants' school are supported by the incumbent and his lady; the parochial school-house for the girls was built in 1810 by subscription, and that for the boys, a good slated building, was erected at an expense of £150, of which £50 was given by the Association for Discountenancing Vice, £50 by the Earl of Shannon, and £50 by the Rev. Horatio Townsend. A large and handsome school-house, containing three rooms, with a residence for the mistress, and in which are 400 girls, was built in 1835, by subscription and a grant of £310 from the National Board, on ground given by the Earl of Shannon. There are eight private schools, in which are about 300 children; and a Sunday school.

from Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837.

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Gazetteers

The transcription of the section for this parish from the National Gazetteer (1868), provided by Colin Hinson.

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