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Lismore & Mocollop

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"LISMORE, (and Mocollop) an united parish, post and market town, and seat of a diocese in the barony of Coshmere, county Waterford, and in the barony of Condons and Clangibbon, county Cork, province of Munster, Ireland. There is a station on the Waterford and Limerick line at Clonmel for Dungarvan and Lismore. The parish is 10 miles long, and its greatest breadth is 8. It includes the villages of Tallnobridge and Ballyduff, the city of Lismore, and the town of Cappoquin. The river Blackwater flows partly through, and then along the E. of the parish. The river Bride traces part of the southern boundary, and the Knockmealdown mountains are prominent in the N. The surface is very mountainous. It was ravaged by the Danes at various periods between the years 978 and 1157. In 1172, Henry II. declared the English law here. The benefice of Lismore, value £230, in the patronage of the dean, includes the cathedral district, with Coppoquin and Macollop, which are in the patronage of the vicars-choral. The cathedral is supposed to have been first founded in the 7th century by St. Carthagh, and burnt in the 12th century. It was succeeded by another edifice, which was demolished in the Munster rebellion by Fitzgibbon, the White Knight. It was again refounded by the Earl of Cork in 1633, but falling into decay, it was entirely re-built about a century ago. The building is cruciform, combining the Gothic and Saxon styles of architecture, with a spire, and Norman portal. It contains tombs of the Magraths;and Musgraves of Tourin, and others. In the parish are a Roman Catholic chapel, and a Presbyterian meeting-house. There are several private schools, besides the National and parish schools. The town is situated on rising ground, near the S. bank of the river Blackwater. It was formerly a parliamentary borough, chartered by James I., and sent two members to the Irish Parliament. Lismore, though once a city of importance, degenerated rapidly until about the middle of the last century, when, under the auspices of the Duke of Devonshire, great improvements were carried out; the bridge which spans the river was built, new streets formed, gaol and sessions-house built. The trade is not considerable, but a rather extensive salmon-fishery is carried on, and the river affords communication with the port of Youghal. It is governed by the county magistrates. The principal charitable institutions are the poorhouse, Earl of Cork's almshouses, fever hospital, and dispensary. -Perhaps the most attractive feature is Lismore Castle, which occupies an elevated site. It was founded in 1185 by the Earl of Mortaigne, afterwards King John. Soon after, it was entirely demolished by the Irish, but was rebuilt, and became the episcopal seat of the diocese, till it was granted by Bishop Magrath to Sir W. Raleigh, in 1589. It sustained a siege by the rebels in 1641; and again in 1643, under General Purcell, it withstood a tremendous force. In 1645 it was burnt by Lord Castlehaven; again being restored, it became the residence of the Boyles, and the birth-place of the great Robert Boyle. It is now in the possession of the Cavendish family, and was visited by James II. in 1785, and also by Lord Lieutenant the Duke of Rutland. Some paintings and specimens of tapestry are preserved in the castle. The diocese of Lismore is in the ecclesiastical province of Dublin; it was joined to Waterford in 1358, and subsequently to Cashel. It comprises 323,500 acres in counties Waterford and Tipperary, and contains forty-seven benefices. The chapter consists of a dean, precentor, chancellor, treasurer, archdeacon, prebendaries, vicar-general, vicars-choral, &c. The Roman Catholic diocese is united to that of Waterford. The Poor-law Union of Lismore has nine electoral divisions in counties Waterford and Cork. There is a police station in the town. Petty sessions are held once a fortnight, and general sessions in April, July, October, and December. Kilbree fort is situated in the parish; also traces of earthworks. Slate is quarried, and there are indications of copper, lead, and iron. Lismore gives title of viscount and baron to the O'Callaghans of Shanbally. Wednesday is market day. Fairs are held on 25th May, 25th September, and 12th November."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2018

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Gazetteers

The transcription of the section for this parish from the National Gazetteer (1868), provided by Colin Hinson.

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Historical Geography

The civil parish of Lismore & Mocollop contained the townlands of:
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