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Miscellaneous

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In 1868, the parish of Miscellaneous contained the following places:

"ARDS BARONY, one of the ten baronies of the county of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland, occupies the long, narrow peninsula extending southward from the north-eastern extremity of the county. It is bounded on the N. by Belfast Lough, on the E. and S. by the Irish Channel, and on the W. by Strangford Lough, and the barony of Lower Castlereagh. The barony contains Kirkcubbin and PortaFerry, the parishes of Ardkeen, Ardquin, Ballyphillip, Ballytrustan, Ballywalter, Castleboy, Donaghadee, Greyabbey, Inishargy, St. Andrew's or Ballyhalbert, Slanes, Witter, and part of Bangor and Newtownards."

"CHAPEL ISLAND, an island in Lough Strangford, in the county of Down, Ireland, near Grey Abbey."

"CLANEBOY, a territory comprising parts of county Down and county Antrim, in Ireland. It was formerly the country of the Hugh-boy O'Neills, and from them was called Clanhugh-boy. It is divided into North and South, or Upper and Lower."

"CLOUGH-MOR, (or Slieve-bane Mountain), one of the smaller summits of the Mourne range, near the village of Rosstrevor, in the county of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland. Its height is 1,595 feet, and half way up its side is a remarkable block of granite, called the Clough-Mor, or "Great Stone; "it weighs about 30 tons, and though bearing every appearance of having been placed there by human hands, is probably a boulder dropped by an iceberg. The view from this summit is one of imposing grandeur.

"CONLY, an island in Lough Strangford, in the county of Down, Ireland."

"COW AND CALF, a rock in Dundrum Bay, off the coast of county Down, Ireland. It is noted for the wreck of the Great Britain steamer in 1846."

"CRANFIELD, a promontory in the barony of Mourne, in the county of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland, 2 miles S.E. of Greencastle. It forms the N. wall to the mouth of Carlingford Bay."

"CREEVY, a small lough in the barony of Upper Castlereagh, in the county of Down, Ireland."

"DEPUTY ROCK, in the Channel, between the county of Down and the Copeland Islands, province of Ulster, Ireland. Its position is about one-third of the distance between the mainland and Big Island, and it lies 10 feet below high-water mark."

"DERRICK-CLAGH, a small lough in the county of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland, near Newry. Goatschurch, an old chapel, stood on its northern extremity."

"DERRYOGUE, a harbour in the barony of Mourne, in the county of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland, near Kilkeel. An abundance of fish is taken here."

"DUFFERIN, a barony in the county of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland. It is bounded on the N. and W. by Castlereagh, on the S. by Lecale, and on the E. by Lough Strangford. It contains parts of the parishes of Killyleagh and Killinchy, the villages of Killinchy and Tullyvery, and the town of Killyleagh, comprising 17,208 acres. Its surface is hilly, and diversified with numerous lakes, the principal of which is Lough Clay. The Blackwoods of Claneboy take their title from this barony."

"EAGLE MOUNTAIN, a principal summit of the Mourne range, county Down, Ulster, Ireland, 4 miles S.E. of Hilltown. It rises 2,084 feet above sea level, and has one of the springs of the river Bann falling from its side."

"KILLARD POINT, a headland on the S. side of Lough Strongford, county Down, Ireland."

"KILLOWEN, a headland on the west side of Carlingford Bay, county Down, Ireland."

"KILWARLIN, an ancient division of the barony of Lower Iveagh, county Down, Ireland. It is situated on the river Lagan."

"KINELARTY, a barony in county Down, province of Ulster, Ireland. It is 11 miles long, and its greatest breadth is 7 miles. Its boundaries are Upper Castlereagh on the N., Dufferin on the E., Dundrum Harbour on the S., and Upper and Lower Iveagh on the W. It contains the parish of Loughinisland, and parts of Annahilt, Dromara, Kilmegan, Kilmore, and Magheradrool, and the town of Ballinahinch. This barony was the ancient territory of the MacArtanes."

"LAGAN, a river rising among the North Slieve-Croob mountains, in the barony of Kinelearty, county Down, province of Ulster, Ireland. It pursues its course in a W. and N.W. direction past Dromore, Magheralin, and Lisburn, and falls into Belfast Lough; after a course of about 35 miles. Near English Town it is joined by the Lagan canal, which opens the navigation between Belfast Lough and Lough Neagh."

"LONG ROCK, a dangerous reef off Ballywalter, in county Down, Ireland."

"LOWER CASTLEREAGH BARONY, one of the 10 baronies or subdivisions of the county of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland, situated in the northern part of the county, and bounded on the N. by Belfast Lough, on the E. by the barony of Ards and Strangford Lough, on the S. by the barony of Dufferin, and on the W. by the barony of Upper Castlereagh. It contains the parishes of Dundonald, Holywood, Kilmood, and Tullynakill, with parts of those of Bangor, Comber, Killinchy, Knockbreda, and Newtownards. The area of the barony is about 51,400 acres.

"MOURNE, a barony of county Down, province Ulster, Ireland. It is bounded by Upper Iveagh, Lough Carlingford, and the sea. Its area is 47,883 acres, and it contains the parish and town of Kilkeel. It is traversed by the Mourne range of mountains between Carlingford and Dundrum bays, the highest point of which, called Slieve Donard, attains an elevation of 2,800 feet above the sea-level. Imbedded in the rocks, which are chiefly granite and slate, many beryls resembling emeralds are found."

"NEWRY, a barony in the counties Down and Armagh, province of Ulster, Ireland. It contains a part of the parish of Newry, and the exempt jurisdiction of Newry and Mourne, comprising Annalong, Kilkeel, Newry, Kilcoo, and Kilmegan. The lordship is presided over by the Earl of Kilmorey, under whom are the principal vicar general, registrar, and seneschal."

"NORTH CLAY LOUGH, (and South Clay Lough) two small loughs near Killyleagh, county of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland. There is another place of the same name in the parish of Keady, in the barony and county of Armagh, where lead is found.

"QUOILE, (or Ballinahinch), a river in the county of Down, Ireland. It falls into Lough Strangford, at the S.W. corner of which is Quoile-quay, which serves as the port for Downpatrick and sub-port to Newry.

"SCATRICK, an islet on the E. side of Lough Strangford, county Down, Ireland, 2 miles N.E. of Kellinchy."

"SHARK, a lough on the borders of the counties of Armagh and Down, Ireland, 2 miles N.E. of Pointzpass, close to the Newry canal."

"SHEEPLAND, a small harbour on the coast of county Down, Ireland, 2 miles N.E. of Ardglass."

"SHIMNA, a stream of the county of Down, Ireland, rises in the Mourne mountains, and falls into Dundrum Bay, near Newcastle."

"STRANGFORD, a sea loch on the coast of county Down, Ireland. It is connected with the sea by a narrow passage about three-quarters of a mile broad, and 6 miles long, defended at the entrance by the headlands called Killard and Ballyquintin. The loch is near 16 miles long and 3 broad, and contains numerous small islands and rocks."

"TAGGART, an islet in Lough Strangford, county Down, near Killyleagh; also another islet in Clew Bay, county Mayo, Ireland."

"TARA BAY, a small harbour on the coast of county Down, Ireland, 3 miles S.E. of Portaferry. It is sheltered by Tara Hill and Ballyquintin Point."

"THE BANN, a river in the north-eastern part of Ireland, which rises among the Mourne mountains, near the southern coast of the county of Down, and flows in a north-westerly direction to Lough Neagh, into which it falls not far from the mouth of the Blackwater. It quits Lough Neagh at its northern extremity, pursuing a course in the same direction as before, and finally falls into the North Sea, a little below the town of Coleraine. The length of the upper section of the river is about 25 miles; that of the lower about 33 miles. Its total length, including the lough, is about 75 miles. The upper river divides, through the greater part of its course, the counties of Down and Armagh, and the lower river forms the boundary of the counties of Antrim and Londonderry from the lough to within a few miles of Coleraine. It receives the waters of several small streams. The navigation of the river begins at Portadown, where it is joined by the Newry canal. The stream is rapid, and there are several falls. From its source to the ocean the total fall is about 370 feet. The towns it passes are Banbridge and Gilford, in the county of Down; Portadown, in the county of Armagh; Toome and Portglenone, in Antrim; and Kilrea and Coleraine, in Londonderry. The Belfast and Armagh railway crosses the river at Portadown. There is a valuable salmon fishery near Coleraine. The entrance to the river is impeded by the bar at the mouth. Important works have been established for improving the navigation and the drainage of the country on the lower river.

"UPPER AND LOWER LECALE, a barony in county Down, province of Ulster, Ireland. It is 9 miles long, and its greatest breadth is 8. It is environed by part of Lough Strangford, the Irish Sea, and the baronies of Upper Iveagh and Dufferin. It contains the parishes of Ardglass, Ballee, Ballycalter, Ballykinter, Bright, Down, Dunsfort, Inch, Kilclief, Rathmullen, Saul, Tyrella, and part of Kilmegan. This barony was anciently the territory of the Macgenises.

"UPPER CASTLEREAGH BARONY, one of the 10 baronies or subdivisions of the county of Down, province of Ulster, Ireland, situated in the northern part of the county, and bounded on the N. by Belfast Lough, on the E. by the baronies of Lower Castlereagh and Dufferin, on the S.W. by the baronies of Kinelarty and Lower Iveagh, and on the N.W. by the river Lagan, separating the county from Antrim. It contains the parishes of Drumbo, Killaney, and Saintfield, with parts of the parishes of Blaris, Comber, Drumbeg, Killinchy, Killyleagh, Kilmore, Knockbreda, and Lambeg. The barony extends over an area of about 55,300 acres.

"UPPER and LOWER ITEAGH, two baronies in the county Down, province of Ulster, Ireland. The surface of these baronies is mountainous, containing offshoots of the Mourne range. The river Bann runs through Upper Iveagh, which is 14.miles long by 9 miles broad, and contains the parishes of Annaghclone, Clonduff, Clonallen, Drumballyroney, Drumgrath, Drumgooland, Danaghmoore, Kilbroney, Kilcoo, Maghera, Warrenspoint, and part of the parishes of Aghaderg, Dromara, Garvaghy, Kilmegan, and Seapatrick. Lower Iveagh is 18 miles long by 16 broad, and contains the parishes of Donaghcloney, Dromore, (and town), Hillsborough (and town), Magherally, St. Inn's of Moira, Tullylish, and parts of Aghaderg, Annahill, Blaris, Dromara, Garvaghy, Magheradrool, Maghcralin, Seapatrick, and Shankill, likewise the towns of Gilford and Moira.

"WHITEWATER, a stream of county Down, Ireland, rises in the Mour-He mountains, and falls into Carlingford Lough."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2018