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Help and advice for Miscellaneous

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Miscellaneous

"BOG OF ALLEN, a vast swamp or series of swamps, in the middle of Ireland, extending from Kildare in the east, through King's County and Queen's County, to Westmeath, where it is bounded by the Shannon. Its length is about 50 miles, and its breadth about 25, and it comprises an area of nearly 240,000 English acres. It lies about 250 feet above the level of the sea, and is divided at intervals by ridges of more elevated and dry ground. The peat bed has an average thickness of 25 feet, and varies from a moss at the top, to a dark peat in the middle, and a hard black bed at the bottom. Underneath it is clay and a limestone gravel. The Royal and Grand canals traverse this morrass, and the rivers Barrow, Boyne, and Brosna take their rise in it. The Isle of Allen is a small cultivated tract in the midst of bog, in Kildare county. The Hill of Allen is near the Isle, sad rises to the height of 676 feet, having the village of Allen at its foot. This bog is visible from the Hill of Croghen near Philipstown. Some attempts have been made to reclaim parts of it, but hitherto without much success. It still remains almost entirely waste.

"BALLYBOY BARONY, one of the twelve baronies or subdivisions of King's County, in the province of Leinster, Ireland, situated in the centre of the county, and bounded on the N. by the barony of Ballycowan, on the E. by the barony of Geashill, on the S. by Queen's County, and on the W. by the baronies of Eglish and Garrycastle. It comprises the parishes of Ballyboy and Killoughy with the town of Frankford. The area of the barony is about 32,400 acres."

"BALLYBRITT BARONY, one of the twelve baronies or subdivisions of King's County, in the province of Leinster, bounded on the N. by the barony of Eglish, on the E. by Queen's County, on the S. by the barony of Clonlisk, and on the W. by that barony and the county of Tipperary. It contains the parishes of Birr Kinnitty, Letterluna, Roscomroe, and Seirkieran, with parts of Aghancon, Corbally, Ettagh, Kilcolman, and Roscrea. The area of the barony is about 54,000 acres."

"BALLYCOWAN BARONY, one of the 12 baronies or subdivisions of King's County, in the province of Leinster, Ireland, situated in the northern part of the county, and bounded on the N. by the barony of Kilcoursey and the county of Westmeath, on the E. by the barony of Geashill, on the S. by the barony of Ballyboy, and on the W. by the barony of Garrycastle. It contains the parishes of Kilbride, Lynally, and Rahan, part of the parish of Durrow, and the town of Tullamore. The area of this barony is about 38,600 acres, a considerable part of which is bog."

"CLONLISK, a barony in King's County, province of Leinster, Ireland. It is situated at the extreme S. of the county and is bounded on the S.E. and W. by the county of Tipperary, and on the N. by the barony of Ballybritt. It contains the parishes of Dunkerrin, Castletownely, Kilcomin, Finglass, Shinrone Kilmurryely, and Templeharry, and parts of Borrisnafarney, Aghancon, Corbally, Ettagh, Cullenwaine, Kilcolman, and Roscrea. This barony is about 13 miles long, and its greatest breadth 6 miles. It has an area of 49,053 acres; including parts of Lough Nahinch and the Devil-bit mountains. The soil is of varied quality, on a substratum of limestone gravel. There are several streams, which fall into the Shannon."

"COOLDERRY, two small places of this name, one in King's County, the other in Monaghan, Ireland."

"COOLESTOWN, (or Collastown), a barony in King's County, province of Leinster, Ireland, bounded by the barony of Warrenstown on the N., by the county of Kildare on the E., and by the barony of Philipstown on the S. and W. It contains the parishes of Ballynakill, Clonsast, and Monasteroris, and part of Castlejordan. Its length is 9½ miles, its width at the widest points is near 7 miles, and its area 47,882 acres. The country is flat, with much bog and waste land. The river Boyne effects the drainage of the N. and the Feagile of the S. portinn.

"COOLGOWNY, a large bog in the barony of Eglish, in King's County, province of Leinster, Ireland. Limestone and gravel are found beneath the surface."

"DERRINBOY, (called also CADAMSTOWN, and LETTRYBROOK), a bog, in the barony of Ballyboy, King's County, Leinster, Ireland. Its area is a little over 1,509 acres."

"DERRYADD, a bog in the barony of Geashill, in King's County, province of Leinster, Ireland. The road from Tullamore to Killeagh passes through its eastern end. It covers an extent of 1,166 acres of wet bog. Surrounding it are the bogs of Cloncon, Killeenmore, and Derrygolan."

"DOWN, a bog in King's County, province of Leinster, Ireland. It lies near Philipstown, and covers 1,547 acres."

"EGLISH, a barony in King's County, province of Leinster, Ireland, bounded on the N.W. by Garry-Castle, N.E. by Ballboy, and S.E. by Ballybrit. Its length is about 7 miles, by 6 broad. It contains the parishes of Eglish and Drumcullen, comprising about 28,704 acres, and is sometimes called the barony of Fircall."

"GARRYCASTLE, a barony in King's County, province of Leinster, Ireland. It is bounded on the N. by Westmeath, on the S.W. by Tipperary, and on the W. by Galway. The Shannon waters the N. and N.W. border, and the Brosna and Grand canal traverse the interior. The barony extends over an area of 103,879 acres, containing the parishes of Clonmacnoise, Gallen, Lusmagh, Lemonaghan, Reynagh, Tisaran, and Killagally, sometimes called Wheery; also the towns of Banagher, Ferbane, and Shannon-bridge. The principal villages are-Cloghan, Clonana, and Shannon-harbour. The surface is generally boggy, particularly in the N. and W., but large and accessible limestone gravel beds facilitate improvement. The old baronial castle, formerly of the MacCaghlan family, is seen on the Birr and Banagher road."

"GEASHILL, a barony in King's County, province of Leinster, Ireland. It is bounded on the S. by Queen's County, on the W. by the baronies of Ballyboy and Ballycowan, and on the N. and E. by Philipstown. Its area is 30,874 acres, comprising parts of the parishes of Ballykean and Geashill. Part of the Bog of Allen occupies the N. part of the barony The Grand canal and the Clodagh river pass through the barony."

"KILCOURSEY, a barony in King's County, province of Leinster, Ireland. It is 6 miles in length and breadth, and is bounded by the baronies of Garry Castle and Ballycowan, and by the county of Westmeath. The surface is flat and boggy, and is traversed by the river Brosna. It contains the parish of Kilbride-Langan, and parts of those of Ardnurcher, Kilcumreragh, and Kilmanaghan, with the villages of Charlestown and Clara. This barony lies within the Poor-law Union of Tullamore. It was the ancient district called Muintir Hagan, and gives title of viscount to Earl Cavan."

"KILMALEADY, a bog in King's County, Ireland, 2 miles N. of Clara. It burst some years ago, and in consequence has moved several miles."

"LOG, an extensive bog in King's County, Ireland, 3 miles N.W. of Frankford. It comprises above 6,000 acres."

"MOANVAGHAN, an extensive bog in King's County, Ireland, near Portarlington."

"MONFAN, a bog in King's County, Ireland, N. of Lough Fin."

"MOYCLARE, a bog in King's County, Ireland, near Ferbane."

"SILVER RIVER, a stream of the King's County, Ireland, rises in the Silverbloom mountains, and joins the river Brosna near Ferbane."

"THE BARROW, a river, in the south-east of Ireland, which rises in the Slievebloom mountains on the borders of King's County and Queen's County, and after an easterly course, of about 15 miles, runs southward to the sea at Waterford harbour. Its entire length is about 100 miles, and between Portarlington and Waterford it has a fall of about 227 feet. It forms, for a few miles, the boundary of King's County and Queen's County; then that of the latter and Kildare; crosses a corner of Kildare, and separates Queen's County from Wicklow; crosses Carlow, then forms the boundary of that county and Kilkenny, and finally that of Kilkenny and Wexford. In its course the Barrow passes the towns of Portarlington, Monasterevan, Athy, Carlow, New Ross, and several others. Near Monasterevan it receives the waters of the Little Barrow; above New Ross it is joined by the river Nore, and near Waterford by the river Suir. It has several smaller tributaries. It is navigable for large vessels up to New Ross, and for barges as far as Athy. At Athy a branch of the Grand canal connects it with Dublin. The name of this river is from a Celtic word signifying "boundary."

"WARRENSTOWN, a barony in the north-eastern division of King's County, Ireland, contains the parishes of Ballymacwilliam and parts of Ballyburly and Castlejordan; comprising 21,462 acres."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2018