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Wicklow (town)

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"WICKLOW, a sea-port, assize, borough, market, and post-town, partly in the parish of RATHNEW, barony of NEWCASTLE, but chiefly in that of KILPOOLE, barony of ARKLOW, county of WICKLOW, and province of LEINSTER, 24 miles (S. S. E.) from Dublin, on the coast road to Arklow; containing 2963 inhabitants. Its ancient name Wykinglo, or Wyhinglogh, is derived from its situation at the southern extremity of a narrow creek shut out from the sea by a long narrow peninsula called the Murragh. It is supposed to have been one of the maritime stations occupied by the Danes previously to the landing of the English in 1169, and to have been called by them Wigginge Lough, "the Lake of Ships." Afterwards it formed part of the extensive possessions granted by Strongbow to Maurice Fitzgerald, who commenced the building of a castle here for the protection of his property, the execution of which was discontinued in consequence of his death in 1176. His sons were subsequently dispossessed of their inheritance by William Fitz-Aldelm, and compelled to accept in exchange for it the decayed and defenceless city of Ferns. In 1301 the town was burned by the Irish, but the castle was subsequently put into a state of defence, in 1375, by William Fitzwilliam, a descendant of one of the early English settlers, in whose family the constableship continued for several generations. ..." [Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, Samuel Lewis, 1837]

"WICKLOW, a parish, a seaport, market town, and municipal borough and county town of county Wicklow, province of Leinster, Ireland, 15 miles N. of Arklow, and 31 S.E. of Dublin. It is situated on the estuary of the river Vartry, in the parishes of Kilpoole, Rathnew, and Drumkay, and is a station on the Dublin, Wicklow, and Wexford railway. The estuary of the Vartry, called Brom Lough, into which the river falls about 2 miles above the town, is so narrow at its mouth as to be crossed by a bridge of eight arches. It is separated from the sea by a narrow strip of land called the Murragh, upon which races are occasionally held. There is a bar across the entrance to the harbour, on which there is only 8 or 9 feet of water at high tide, rendering it fit only for small craft. ... More" [Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2018]

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Churches

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Church History

"The parish church of Drumkay is situated near the round mound. The S. door has a Norman arch, the remains of the old building. There are a Roman Catholic chapel, and meeting-houses for Methodists and Friends." [Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2018]

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Description & Travel

Wicklow town on wikipedia

You can see pictures of Wicklow (town) which are provided by:

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Gazetteers

The transcription of the section for this parish from the National Gazetteer (1868), provided by Colin Hinson.

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Historical Geography

Wicklow town - on logainm.ie

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Maps

You can see maps centred on OSI grid reference T3123993978 (Lat/Lon: 52.980793, -6.046772), Wicklow (town) which are provided by:

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Occupations

"The import trade is confined to timber, iron, coals, and limestone, and the exports to agricultural produce and ore raised in the various mines of the county. The fishery is good, but the shallowness of the harbour prevents the employment of proper vessels." [Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2018]

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Population

[Wicklow] "Its population in 1851 was 3,147, and in 1861 3,448, inhabiting 582 houses." [Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2018]

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Religion & Religious Life

"Of the population in 1861, 649 were members of the Established Church, 2,673 were Roman Catholics, 26 Presbyterians, 68 Methodists, 1 Independent, and 31 of the Society of Friends." [Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868 by Colin Hinson ©2018]