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National Gazetteer, 1868

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Coylton - Extract from National Gazetteer, 1868

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"COYLTON, a parish in the district of Kyle, in the county of Ayr, Scotland. It contains a village of its own name, and also the villages of Craighall, Gadgirthholm, Bankfoot, Joppa, and Knockshoggleholm. It extends 12 miles in a north-westerly direction, with a breadth of about 2 miles. The northern districts are flat or undulating; the middle rise into elevations called the Craigs of Coyl, with an elevation of 750 feet above the sea; and the upper or southern district is pastoral, and has an extreme elevation of 1,100 feet. Seven-tenths of the surface is under tillage, two-tenths are in pasture, and the remainder in wood. Coal is largely mined, and limestone, sandstone, and whinstone are extensively quarried. Sundrum, Gadgirth, and Rankinston are the principal seats. This parish, and the river Coyle which flows through its interior, are supposed to take their name from an ancient king called Coilus, who is said to have been slain at Coylesfield, 5 miles S. of Coylton. The village of Coylton is an insignificant place, 6 miles E. of the town of Ayr. This parish is in the presbytery of Ayr, and in the patronage of the crown. The stipend of the minister is £254."

"GADGIRTH HOLM, (and Gadgirth Bankfoot) a village in the parish of Coylton, Ayrshire, Scotland, 5 miles E. of Ayr."

"JOPPA, a village in the parish of Coylton, county Ayr, Scotland, 5 miles S.S.E. of Ayr."

"KNOCKSHOGGLEHOLM, a village in the parish of Coylton, county Ayr, Scotland, 5 miles E. of Ayr. It is situated on Coylton Water, near the river Doon."

Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)
Transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003