Hide

Pulteney-Town town

hide
Hide

1851 - Topographical Dictionary of Scotland, Samuel Lewis

PULTENEY-TOWN, a town, in the parish of Wick, county of Caithness; adjoining the town of Wick, and containing 3132 inhabitants. This place, which forms a populous part of the parliamentary burgh of Wick, owes its origin to the British Society for extending Fisheries, who in 1808 purchased from the family of Duffus a portion of the lands of Hempriggs, which they laid out in building lots, and granted in perpetual feus for the erection of houses for persons connected with the fisheries of Wick, to further the extension of which they constructed harbours and other works, as detailed in the article on Wick. Pulteney-Town is situated on the south side of the river Wick, over which is a bridge of three arches, connecting it with the town. It consists of several well-formed streets of neatly-built houses, a handsome range of buildings called Argyll-square, and numerous villas inhabited by the more opulent families of the burgh. There is a reading and news room supported by subscription. An iron foundry has been established, with several other works, which are noticed in the account of Wick; and a floating-dock has been constructed, which will admit a vessel of 500 tons or two of 100 tons' burthen. In 1844 an act was passed for improving and enlarging the harbour; for better lighting and cleansing the place, and better supplying it with water. There are places of worship for members of the Free Church, the United Presbyterian Church, and Reformed Presbyterians. A school called the Academy, for which a spacious building has been erected by the British Society, at a cost of £1700, is under the superintendence of two masters, to whom the company allow a salary, in addition to the fees; it is attended by about ninety children. There is also a Sabbath school, in which are 320 children. See the article on Wick.