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LLANGATHEN

In 1868, the parish of Llangathen contained the following places:

"LLANGATHEN, a parish in the hundred of Cathinog, county Carmarthen, 3; miles W. of Llandilo Fawr, its post town, and 10 E. of Carmarthen. It is situated in the vale of Towey, on the N. bank of the river, within a short distance of Grongar Hill, from which is a view celebrated by the poet Dyer, who was born in the mansion of Aberglasney. The parish, which is of considerable extent, includes about ten hamlets, the principal of which are Berthlwyd and Brynhafod. Here are limestone quarries and lead mines. The living is a vicarage in the diocese of St. David's, value £130, in the patronage of the bishop. The church is dedicated to St. Cathan, and has monuments to Bishop Rudd and others. The endowments belonging to the parish produce about £12 per annum. Cwrt Henry is a seat here. There are some views in this neighbourhood, and traces of ancient camps. A ferry across the river leads from this to "Golden Grove," a seat of the Earl of Cawdor, inherited by him from the Vaughans, earls of Carberry. This mansion is modern, and in the Elizabethan style of architecture, the old house having been burnt down. In the interior are some portraits of the Vaughans, and one of Lady Dorothy Sidney, the "Sacharissa" of the poet, also a Canaletti and a Luca Giordano."

"ABERGLASNEY, in the parish of Llangathen, near the village of Llandilo Fawr, in the county of Carmarthen, 14 miles N.E. of Carmarthen. It is situated on the river Glasney, at a short distance from Grongar Hill."

"ALLTYGAR, a hamlet in the parish of Llangathen, hundred of Cathinog, in the county of Carmarthen, South Wales, 3 miles to the W. of Llandilo Fawr."

"BERTHLWYD, (and Brynhafod) hamlets in the parish of Llangathen, hundred of Cathinog, in the county of Carmarthen, South Wales, 3 miles from Llandeilofawr.

"BRYNHAFOD, a hamlet in the parish of Llangathen, hundred of Cathinog, in the county of Carmarthen, South Wales, 2 miles from Llandilo Fawr."

"CWMYSGIFAROWG, a hamlet in the parish of Llangathen, in the county of Carmarthen, 3 miles W. of Llandilo-Fawr."

"DRYSLWYN, a hamlet in the parish of Llangathen, in the county of Carmarthen, 3 miles W. of Llandeilo-fawr. It is situated in the Vale of Tywi. Near Grongar Hill are extensive ruins of Dryslwyn Castle, which belonged to the South Wales princes."

"GRONGAR HILL, in the parish of Llangathen, in county Carmarthen, about 3 miles W. of Llandeilofawr. It is situated near the river Towy, and commands an extensive and varied prospect, the subject of Dyer's poem. On its summit are traces of a Roman camp 450 feet by 300, known as the cron gaer, or "round fort," and five circular trenches, supposed to be of British origin."

"LLAN-BLAENYNIS, a hamlet in the parish of Llangathen, county Carmarthen, 3 miles W. of Llandilo-fawr."

"MOUNTAIN, a hamlet in the parish of Llangathen, county Carmarthen, 3 miles W. of Llandilo Fawr."

"TREGYNIN, a hamlet in the parish of Llangathen, county Carmarthen, 4 miles W. of Llandilo Fawr."

"YSGWYN, a hamlet in the parish of Llangathen, county Carmarthen, 3 miles W. of Llandilo-Fawr."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2018