Miscellaneous

Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868] by Colin Hinson ©2018

This page is in two sections, the first section below relates to parishes which have parts of them in two counties

  • "DODDLESTON, a parish partly in the county of Flint, North Wales, but chiefly in the lower division of the hundred of Broxton, and partly in that of Maylor, in the county palatine of Chester, 5 miles S.W. of Chester, its post town. It contains the townships of Higher and Lower Kinnerton, Doddleston, and Bodidris. The Shrewsbury and Chester branch of the Great Western railway passes through the village before entering Flint. At Balderton Bridge, in this parish, Hugh Cyvelioc, Earl of Chester, defeated the Welsh with great slaughter, and raised a rampart of the heads of the slain. Doddleston Castle, the residence of the Boydells, formerly stood here. The Hall, occupied by the Manley family, was afterwards built upon its site, and during the civil wars was made the head-quarters of the army besieging Chester. A farmhouse now stands on the spot. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Chester, value £593, in the patronage of the dean and chapter. The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is an ancient compact structure with tower, and contains a monument of Baron Ellesmere, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal in the reign of James I. The charities produce about £6 per annum. The Primitive Methodists have a chapel. The Marquis of Westminster is lord of the manor." 
  • "BABYLON, a hamlet in the parish of Doddleston and hundred of Maylor, in the county of Flint, North Wales, 3 miles from Caergwrle. It lies a little to the south of the river Dee, and close to the Chester and Shrewsbury railway." 
  • "HIGHER KINNERTON, a township in the parish of Doddleston, county Flint, 3 miles N.E. of Caergwrle. It contains the hamlets of Kinnerton Bridge, Kinnerton Green, Babylon, and Water's Green. 
  • "WATERS GREEN, a hamlet in the parish of Doddleston, county Flint, 2 miles N.E. of Caergwrle."
  • (see main page Dodleston in Cheshire)

 

  • "ELLESMERE, a parish and market town, partly in the Ellesmere division of the hundred of Pimhill, and partly in the hundred of Maylor, in the county of Salop and county Flint, 6 miles N.E. of the Whittington station on the Shrewsbury and Chester railway, 16 N.W. of Shrewsbury, and 169 from London. It is situated on the Ellesmere canal, near the celebrated lake or mere anciently called Aels mere, from which it derives its name. The parish includes a large number of townships, of which Colemere, Cockshutt, Dudleston, and Penley are the principal. According to the Domesday Survey it appears to have belonged to Earl Roger, and afterwards, in the reign of Edward III., was bestowed upon the Lestranges, and from them came to the families of Kynaston, Stanley, and ultimately to the Egertons, to whom it gives the title of earl. There was a castle here, the possession of which was frequently contested by the English and Welsh chiefs; of this there are no remains, the site is used as a bowling-green, and from it there is a magnificent view over nine or ten counties. In addition to the larger lake, which is bordered on one side by the town, and on the other by the grounds of Oakley Park, there are six small ones, varying in extent from 50 to 120 acres. The neighbourhood abounds with various species of ferns and mosses. The town does not present any particular appearance of antiquity; it is well paved, clean, lighted with gas, and the houses tolerably well built. It has a market-place, in which is situated the townhall, a substantial edifice of brick faced with freestone. The principal employments are malting, iron and brass founding (both extensively carried en), and tanning. There are also stocking makers and flax spinners. The Ellesmere canal, with its several branches, affords great facilities for the transmission of goods to all parts of the country. It unites the Severn, the Dee, and the Mersey, forming a line of navigation from Liverpool to Bristol, and opens a communication with North Wales. Petty sessions are held hereon the first Monday in every month, and it is a polling-place for the northern division of the county. The government of affairs is vested in two bailiffs, chosen annually. There is a mechanics' institution, with a good library. At a short distance from the town, near the margin of the lake, is the house of industry for the Ellesmere Poor-law Union, which comprises nine parishes or places in the county of Salop, and the like number in the county of Flint. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of Lichfield, value £386. The parish church, dedicated to St. Mary, is a commodious structure of ancient date, but has recently undergone extensive repairs. It is in the form of a cross, with a lofty embattled tower, crowned with pinnacles, and containing a clock and a peal of eight bells. On the S. of the chancel is a chapel, containing monuments of the Kynastons, the ceiling of which is elaborately groined. There are also the following district churches, the livings of which are perpetual curacies, and in the patronage of the vicar, viz. Cockshutt, value £86; Dudleston, value £238; and PenIcy, value £105. The parochial charities produce about £115 per annum, £23 of which is for school purposes. The Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel. There are National schools for both sexes, and a school for instructing youth in the higher branches of education. Earl Brownlow is lord of the manor. Tuesday is the market day for corn, butter, cheese, and poultry. Fairs are held on the Tuesday preceding the first Wednesday in each month, for horses, cattle, and live stock." 
  • "PENLEY, a township in the parish of Ellesmere, hundred of Maylor, county Flint, 4 miles N. of Ellesmere, its post town, and 9 from Wem. The village is small. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of Lichfield, value £105, in the patronage of the Vicar of Ellesmere. The church is dedicated to St. Mary. At Penley Hall is a meet for the Wynnstay hounds."
  • (see main page Ellesmere  in Shropshire)

 

  • "ERBISTOCK, a parish partly in the hundred of Bromfield, county Denbigh, and partly in the hundred of Maylor, county Flint, 6 miles S.E. of Wrexham. It is situated on the river Dee, and was formerly part of the demesne of Bangor Priory. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of St. Asaph, value £254, in the patronage of the Bishop of Llandaff. The church is dedicated to St. Hilary."
  • (see main page Erbistock in Denbighshire)

 

  • "GRESFORD, a parish in the hundreds of Bromfield and Mold, and in county Denbigh and county Flint, 3 miles N.E. of Wrexham, its post town, and 4 N.W. of Holt. The Shrewsbury and Chester branch of the Great Western line of railway has a station here. It is beautifully situated on the banks of the river Alen, and includes the townships of Allington, Gwersyllt, Gresford, Rosset, and several others. The name appears to be derived from Crow-.ford, i.e. "road of the Cross." The parish is of large, extent, and very fertile. It yields abundance of coal. The living is a vicarage* with the perpetual curacies of Gwersyllt and Rosset annexed, in the diocese of St. Asaph, value £714, in the patronage of the Bishop of St. Asaph. The parish church of Gresford is a fine structure of the 15th century; its length 123 feet, and width about 60 feet, with tower containing a peal of twelve fine-toned bells, said to be one of the seven wonders of Wales. There are carved effigies of the Apostles and of Henry VII. The interior is neatly fitted up, and has an octagonal font, twelve stalls finely carved, and several monuments and tablets of the Trevor, Perry, and other families. The E. window is handsome, and in the churchyard are many fine yew-trees. The parochial charities, including a school endowment of £26 by Strode, produce about £140 per annum. At a considerable elevation above the village is a spot called the Rofts, where are traces of a strongly fortified British camp. The principal residence is Gresford Lodge, a handsome mansion built by Wyatt. Fairs are held on Easter Monday, the second Monday in April, last Monday in August, 24th June, 21st August, and 22nd October."
  • "HOSELEY, a lordship in the parish of Gresford, hundred of Mold, county Flint; 4 miles N.E. of Wrexham. It is joined to Merford, and commands a view of Roft's camp."
  • "MERFORD, a lordship in the parish of Gresford, hundred of Mold, county Flint, 3 miles N.E. of Wrexham. At Roft's Camp is a fine view."
  • (see main page Gresford in Denbighshire)

 

  • "LLANARMON-YN-IAL, a parish in the hundred of Yale, county Denbigh (q.v.), 5 miles S. E. of Ruthin, and 9 N. of Llangollen. It contains one township in the county of Flint."
  • "BODIDRIS, a joint township with Truam, in the parish of Llanarmon-yn-Ial, hundred of Yale in the county of Denbigh, and Maelor in the county of Flint, North Wales, 7 miles to the S.E. of Ruthin. The name signifies "house of Idris," and the township contains an old mansion, the seat of the Mostyns, which formerly belonged to a chief named Idras."
  • (see main page Llanarmon-yn-Ial in Denbighshire)

 

  • "MALPAS, a parish, post and market town, chiefly in the hundred of Broxton, county Chester, but partly in the hundred of Maylor, county Flint, 5 miles N.E. of Whitchurch, and 10 S. of the Beeston station on the Chester and Crewe railway. It is situated on an eminence near the river Dee and Ellesmere canal, and contains Beckley, Broxton, Bickerton, and 21 other townships. Malpas was anciently called Depembech, signifying a bad pass or road, and was given by Hugh Lupus, the first Norman Earl of Chester, to Robert Fitzhugh, who had a castle here, but no traces of it are now visible, except a circular mound on which the keep stood. The ancient barons exercised capital jurisdiction within the limits of the barony. It has descended through the Sutton, St. Pierres, &c., principally to the Cholmondeleys, who take hence the title of viscount. It is a polling-place for the election of members for the southern division of the county, and petty sessions are held in the town. Courts leet and baron are held annually, at which constables are appointed. The town is situated on an eminence near the Shrewsbury and Chester road, and commands extensive prospects over a great part of North Wales, Stafford- shire, and the Vale Royal. It consists of four streets, which diverge at right angles from a common centre. It is amply supplied with water from a public well, and is well paved. The magistrates meet monthly at Broxton. The excise-office is held at the Red Lion inn. The houses are in general low and irregularly built. The living is a rectory,* in two medieties, called the higher and lower, in the diocese of Chester, value £1,000 and £910 respectively. The church, dedicated to St. Laurence, has a tower containing a clock and six bells. The interior of the church was restored and beautified at great expense in 1841. It forms a grand appearance with its richly clustered pillars supporting six lofty pointed arches, and a gallery at the W. end. The ceiling is of dark oak, empanelled and richly carved, and the floor inlaid with encaustic tiles. The E. window is ornamented with glass medallions of great antiquity, the gift of the present Marquis of Cholmondeley. There are richly carved screens, enclosing the two ancient chapels of the Cholmondeley and Brereton families, in which are several stained windows, with tombs and effigies of those families. In addition to the parish church, there are two endowed chapels, at Tushingham and Bickerton, the livings of which are perpetual curacies,* value £144 and £120. The parochial charities produce about £302 per annum, oil which £119 goes to Alport's school, £25 to the free grammar school, and £34 to Brereton's almshouses. An infant school has been recently added to the Alport school. Fairs are held on the 5th April, 26th July, and 8th December, for cattle and pedlery."
  • "ISCOYD, (or Iscoed), a chapelry in the parish of Malpas, hundred of Maylor, county Flint, 3 miles W. of Whitchurch. There are brine springs at Wich Brook and Broad Oak. The village is considerable. The inhabitants are chiefly engaged in the collieries. The principal residence is Iscoyd Hall.
  • (see main page Malpas in Cheshire)

 

  • "WREXHAM, a parish in the county of Denbigh, but containing one township in the county of Flint, Wales."
  • "ABENBURY-FECHAN, a township in the parish of Wrexham, in the hundred of Maylor and county of Flint, North Wales, 3 miles N.N.W. of Wrexham. It is watered by the river Clywedog, over which is a bridge. There are iron foundries in the town. It is the only township in the parish of Wrexham that lies in Flintshire; all the other townships are in Denbighshire. It has a separate assessment for the maintenance of its poor."
  • (see main page Wrexham in Denbighshire)

 

This section contains all other Miscellaneous places 

"AIR, (or Ayre Point), at the mouth of the river Dee, on its western aide, in the county of Flint, North Wales. It is an important landmark for sailors, having a lighthouse 42 feet in height, with a fixed red light. The lighthouse was erected in 1844, and is supported on piles.

"COLESHILL, a hundred in the county of Flint, contains the boroughs of Flint and Holywell, and the parishes of Northop, Cilcain, Halkyn, Whitford, and Holywell."

"KINMAEL, the seat of Lord Dinorben, in the hundred of Rhuddlan, county Flint, 4 miles W. of St. Asaph. It is situated near the confluence of the rivers Elwy and Clwyd. The mansion was burnt in 1842, but has since been rebuilt on a splendid scale."

"MAYLOR, a hundred county Flint, contains the parishes of Fanmer, Hope, Overton, and Worthenbury, with parts of Bangor, Doddleston, Ellesmere, Erbistock, Llanarmon, Malpas, Threapwood, and Wrexham."

"MOLD, a hundred in county Flint, contains the parishes of Hawarden, Mold, and part of Gresford."

"PRESTATYN, a hundred in the county of Flint, contains the parishes of Dyserth, Gwaenysgor, Llanasaph, Meliden, Newmarket, and part of Rhuddlan."

"RHUDDLAN, a hundred in the county of Flint, North Wales, contains the parishes of Caerwys, Cwm, Tremeirchion, Rhuddlan, Ysceifiogg, and parts of St. Asaph, Bodfary, and Nannerch."

 

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2018