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Gazetteer Lancashire
Gazetteer

M

 

Madge Hill, 1 mile S.E. of Ribchester

B.

MAGHULL, 8 miles N.N.E. of Liverpool, is in the parish of Halsall, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the Rector of Halsall

W.D.

Maghull Hall, 1/2 mile S. of Maghull church

W.D.

Maiden Cross, 31/2 miles N. of Bacap

B.

Maiden Fold, 21/2 miles W. of Blackburn

B.

Maiden's Bridge, 1 mile N.E. of Tatham chapel

L.

Maker Field, a district in which Ashton, commonly called "Ashton-in-the-Willows" is situated

W.D.

Mallow Dale, south-side of Roberansdale

L.

Mallow Dale Pike, 8 miles E. of Lancaster

L.

Malshead, 3 miles S.S.E. of Garstang

A.

MAN'S RIGGS, (Furness) 1 mile N. of Ulverston

L.

Man's Smithy, 1 mile W. of Burton Wood

W.D.

MANCHESTER, (N. lat. 53 25" W. long. 2 10".) the second town in the kingdom, and the largest in the county of Lancaster, is situated upon the rivers Irwell, Irk, and Medlock, 18 miles E. of Warrington; 37 miles E. of Liverpool; 11 miles S.E. of Bolton-le-Moors; 12 miles S.S.W. of Rochdale; 531/2 miles S.S.E. of Lancaster, and 186 miles from London.

In the year 79 the town was conquered by Agricola, who changed its British name of Mancenion to MANCUNIUM. It was afterwards called Mancestre, from whence its present name is derived. William the Conquerer gave Roger de Poictiers all the land between the Mersey and the Ribble. It appears that De Poictiers did not hold Manchester long, before it came into the hands of Robert de Gredley; from whose family it passed to that of West, with the title of Lord de la Warr, one of whom, about 1600, sold the manor to Sir Nicholas Mosley, Knight, whose descendant, Sir Oswald Mosley, Baronet, is the present Lord of the manor, who holds a baronial court here for the recovery of small debts, &c. and two courts leet in the year; at that holden at Michaelmas, the municipal officers (who notwithstanding the size, population, and importance of the town, are only a boroughreeve, two constables, and their deputy are elected. Manchester is joined to Salford by 4 bridges, and they appear one town, though each have their separate officers and government, in the same way that London and Southwark are connected, and to which place the situation of the united towns, on the river Irwell bear a resemblance. (See SALFORD.)

There are nine churches in Manchester (besides those in Salford and its other suburbs) belonging to the establishment, which are the following:

(1) The Collegiate Church, founded in 1422, is the parish church. This venerable pile is very worthy the attention of the curious antiquary. The college is governed by a Warden, (appointed by the King), four Fellows (who are Rectors of the parish) elected by the college, except in case of a lapse, when the King presents; two Chaplains (who are Vicars of the parish) and two clerks, one of which is generally in orders, appointed by the college, and the other appointed by John Trafford, Esq. a right, which has continued in that ancient family from an early period, notwithstanding it continues the profession of the Roman Catholic Religion. There are four singing men, four singing boys, and an organist upon the establishment.

(2) St. Ann's, consecrated July 17, 1712; the living a rectory, in the presentation of the Bishop of Chester.

(3) St. Mary's (with a most elegant spire), consecrated Sep. 29, 1756; the living is a rectory; patrons, the Warden and Fellows of the Collegiate Church.

(4) St. Paul's, consecrated July 28, 1765; the living a perpetual curacy; patrons, the Warden and Fellows of the Collegiate Church.

(5) St. John's, a beautiful modern Gothic church, consecrated July 7, 1769; the living a rectory; patrons, the heirs of the late E. Byrom, Esq. (the founder), for one vacation after the death of the first incumbent, and afterwards, of the Warden and Fellows of the Collegiate Church.

(6) St. James', consecrated Aug. 18, 1788; the living is a perpetual curacy; the presentation is in the founder (Dr. Bayley), and his family, for 60 years from its foundation, and afterwards the Warden and Fellows of the Collegiate Church become the patrons.

(7) St. Michael's, consecrated July 23, 1789; the living is a perpetual curacy; the presentation is in the hands of the heirs of the late Rev. Humphrey Owen (the founder), for 60 years, and afterwards in the Warden and Fellows of the Collegiate Church.

(8) St. Peter's, a very handsome Doric building, beautifully simple, consecrated Sep. 6, 1794. The living is a perpetual curacy; the presentation is vested in 21 trustees, for 60 years from the foundation, and afterwards falls to the Warden and Fellows of the Collegiate Church.

(9) St. Clement's, not consecrated, but opened for divine worship, agreeable to the English rubric, on Christmas day, 1793.

Beside the foregoing places of worship, there are in Manchester (independently of those in Salford and its other suburbs, which will be noticed under their proper heads), two Roman Catholic chapels, one Presbyterian chapel, one Unitarian chapel, five Independent chapels (one of which was intended for the establishment under the name of St. George's), two Quakers' meetings, five Methodist chapels (one of which is for the Welch inhabitants), three Baptist chapels, one New Jerusalem church, and one Jews' Synagogue.

That noble foundation, Cheetham's Hospital, for the maintenance and education of 80 boys, and the capital Library annexed, are well worthy of attention; as are the Infirmary and Lunatic Hospital, and the Dispensary; the Fever Wards, the Lying-in Hospital (on the Salford side of the Irwell), and the parish Workhouse. All the former charities are supported by voluntary subscriptions, and the last by a well-regulated ley on the householders.

In Jan. 1806, a very elegant stone building, called the PORTICO, was opened by subscription, as a News-room, and Library; and a large and magnificent stone edifice is now erecting in the Market-place, to be called the Commercial Buildings, intended for a News and Coffee-room, promising to be both useful and ornamental to the town. The places of amusement are, a very elegant and capacious Theatre Royal, opened for the first time on June 29, 1807; a Subscription Concert Room, which has long been deemed the first amateur concert in the kingdom; Elegant Assembly Rooms, and a Billiard Room. It has three Public Libraries, beside that in Cheetham's Hospital, the College, before-mentioned; and the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society (which has a Hall built solely for its use), is an institution which would reflect honour upon any town.

Manchester has derived great advantages from its situation on the Irwell, navigable to the Mersey, and thence to Liverpool, for vessels of considerable tonnage, as well as from the canal of the late Duke of Bridgewater, the Ashton, the Rochdale, the Peak Forest, the Bolton, and the Bury canals, which all come up to the town.

The weekly market days are Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, the latter being the most considerable, for provisions, though they are to be had here, of any kind, any hour in the week; and Tuesday, for the resort of the country manufacturers. The fairs, which, strictly speaking, are held in Manchester (for the Whit-Monday fair, and that on Nov. 17, are held in Salford), are Easter-Monday, for toys and ale, and boisterous mirth; and Oct. 1, for horses, cattle, hogs, &c. (see Salford).

By the population act of 1801, it appeared, that the united towns of Manchester and Salford (which form one united mass of building), contained 12,649 inhabited houses, occupied by 18,640 families, which were comprized of 39,143 males, and 44,910 females; total, 84,053 persons, of whom 44,599 were employed in actual labour, in the manufactures of the place. The result of the census was evidently under the numbers actually in the town, from the omission of some of the back streets. Since that time, 2000 houses have been erected, and an increase of population of 10,000 is supposed to have taken place. (See Salford).

For a further account of Manchester and Salford, and their suburbs, we refer to the "Manchester Guide," published by the author of this local Gazetteer.

S.

Mare Hill, near Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Market Field, 6 miles S.W. of Lancaster

L.

Marland, 2 miles S.S.W. of Rochdale

S.

MARSDEN (GREAT), 11/2 mile S. of Colne

B.

Marsden (Little), 3 miles S.W. of Colne, under which it has a chapel of ease. It is in the parish of Whalley, the Vicar of which place has the presentation of the curacy. There is a Quaker's meeting house here.

B.

Marsden Hall, Great Marsden

B.

Marsh, at the mouth of the Douglas, 8 miles W.S.W. of Preston

LL.

Marsh, 3 miles N.E. of North Meols

W.D.

Marsh Grange, (Furness) 2 miles N. of Kirkby Ireleth

L.

Marsh Green, 11/2 W. of Wigan

W.D.

Marsh Hall, near Farnworth chapel

W.D.

Marsh Head, 1 mile N.E. of Brindle church

W.D.

Marsh House, 1 mile E. of Grimsnargh church

A.

Marsh Lane, near Brindle

LL.

Marsh Side, North Meols

W.D.

Marshall Cross, 2 miles S. of St. Hellen's

W.D.

Marshaw, at the south-east end of Over Wyer's Dale

L.

Martin, (Furness) 1 mile E. of Kirkby Ireleth

L.

Martin Hill, 3 miles N.N.E. of Ormskirk

W.D.

Martin Lane, 3 miles N. of Ormskirk

W.D.

Martin Meer, 1 mile E. of North Meols; formerly the largest lake in Lancashire, but by the exertions of Thomas Eccleston, Esq. assisted by the advice of the late John Gilbert, Esq. of Worsley, it is now nearly dry, and is converted to the more profitable purposes of agriculture. It is remarkable, that in draining the Meer, eight canoes were found, similar in size, shape, and construction to those used by the American Indians

W.D.

MARTIN'S CROFT, 3 miles E. of Warrington

W.D.

MARTON (GREAT), 3 miles S.W. of Poulton in the Fylde

A.

MARTON (LITTLE), 1 mile E.S.E. of Great Marton

A.

Marton Mere, a lake 1/2 mile E. of Great Marton

A.

Marton Moss, a large morass extending from 1 mile S. to 4 miles S.S.E. of Great Marton

A.

Mascow Smithy, 41/2 miles E.N.E. of Walton-le-Dale

B.

MAWDSLEY, 2 miles S.S.E. of Croston

LL.

May Field, 2 miles S. of Manchester

S.

May Place, 31/2 miles E. of Liverpool Exchange

W.D.

Meadow Head, 21/2 miles S. of Blackburn

B.

Meadowcroft Fold, in Pilsworth

S.

Meal Bank, 2 miles W. of Wray

L.

MEARLEY, 2 miles S.E. of Clitheroe

B.

MEDLAR, 21/2 miles N.N.W. of Kirkham-in-the-Fylde

A.

Medlock, (the river) rises in Saddleworth, (Yorkshire) and enters Lancashire about 1 mile S. of Lees chapel, near which it is augmented by a stream which rises near Beesom Hill; it then runs S. and is joined by a stream which rises near Hawkshead Pike, and by another which rises above Higher Moor, running S. by Oldham, to the N. of Higher Hill, till it falls into the Medlock, which then turns S.W. passing by Clayton, Bradford, Beswick, Holt Town, Ardwick, Chorlton Row, Garret and Hulme, where, after serving as a feeder to the late Duke of Bridgewater's canal, it is precipitated through a basin, into its ancient channel, and falls into the Irwell, near Hulme Hall

S.

Meer Beck, (Furness) a small rivulet which falls into Duddon Water, about 2 miles N.N.W. of Kirkby Ireleth

L.

Meer Brow, 31/2 miles E. of North Meols

LL.

MELLING, 11 miles N.E. of Lancaster, a parish in the deanry of Kirkby Lonsdale. The living is a vicarage; patron the King.

L.

MELLING, 7 miles N.N.W. of Liverpool, in the parish of Halsall, has a chapel of ease; living, a perpetual curacy; patron, the Rector of Halsall

W.D.

Mellings, 2 miles E.S.E. of Wray

L.

MELLOR, 3 miles S. of Ribchester

B.

Meols, or Meals, the land on the sea coast from Formby to Hesketh. See "North Meols," and "Ravers Meols"

W.D.

Mersey, (the) is the principle river in the county. It originates in various small streams, which rise in Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Cheshire; and at Stockport, (where it is joined by the river Tame,) it comes in contact with Lancashire, forming the boundary on its passage to the sea between that county and Cheshire. From Stockport it flows W. to Cheadle (Cheshire), then N. by Northenden (where there is a ford), and turns to the S.W. by Chorlton, near which there is a ferry, known by the name of "Jackson's Boat." The river is augmented at Chorlton by the rivulet Rush, and from hence it runs by Stretford, near which it is crossed by the late Duke of Bridgewater's canal, and by the turnpike-road from Manchester to Altringham; then glows westward by Ashton-upon-Mersey and Carrington, at which place there is a wood bridge over it, for horses. From thence it proceeds circuitously, and is soon after joined by the Irwell, and, at Warburton by the Bollin. It then winds by a serpentine course to the S.W. by Holling's Green, Rixen, Martin's Croft, &c to Warrington. From the junction with the Irwell, the river has been made more convenient for the purposes of navigation by several short canals, which cut off large angles; and in one place, about 14 miles from Manchester, a canal of five perches, cuts off several miles of circuitous bend in the river. Below Warrington the river widens into a broad shallow channel, but at Runcorn it suddenly contracts itself by a headland from the Lancaster side, and soon after spreads still wider than before, and receives the Weaver, when it swells into a noble estuary, on which Liverpool is situated, and below which it empties itself into the Irish Channel

S.

Mickle Hey, near Little Harwood

B.

Middle High Field, 5 miles N.E. of Lancaster

L.

Middle Salter, in Roboransdale

L.

MIDDLETON, (N. lat. 53 31" W. long. 2 7"), 7 miles N.N.E. of Manchester, by the old road, through Chetham and Heaton, but about 51/2 miles by the new road now making, through Blakeley; and 193 miles from London. Middleton is a parish in the deanry of Manchester; the living is a rectory; patron, Lord Suffield, who is also Lord of the Manor, having obtained it by marrying one of the heiresses of the late Sir Ralph Asheton, Bart. whose family had possessed it from the time of Edward VI. This place, which about the year 1770 was a very small village, is now a considerable town. In the year 1791 a grant was obtained from the Crown, to hold a weekly market here on Saturdays, and three annual fairs, viz. the first Thursday after the 10th of March, the first Thursday after the 15th of April, and the second Thursday after September 22. Middleton contains eight hamlets, and has two chapels of ease, viz. Ashworth and Cockey Moor. There are two Methodist chapels in Middleton

S.

MIDDLETON, the township adjoining to and E. of Winwick

W.D.

MIDDLETON, 4 miles S.W. of Lancaster

L.

Middleton Brows, on the sea shore, S.W. of Middleton, near Lancaster

L.

Middleton Hall, 1/2 mile N.E. of Goosenargh

A.

Middleton Hall, the neglected seat of Lord Suffield, 6 miles N.N.E. of Manchester, See "Middleton"

S.

Midge, near Eaves

A.

Midge Hall, 21/2 miles S.E. of North Meols

W.D.

Mill Hill, 1/2 mile E. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Mill House, 21/2 miles S.W. of Cockerham church

L.

Mill Wood, (Low Furness) 1 mile S. of Ulverstone

L.

Miller's House, at the east end of Over Wyer's Dale

L.

Millstone Hagg, east side of Graygarth Fells, a boundary mark between Yorkshire and Lancashire

L.

Milnerow, 2 miles E.S.E. of Rochdale, under which it has a chapel of ease; patron, the Vicar of Rochdale. In this place the celebrated John Collier (better known as Tim Bobbin) spent the greatest part of his life

S.

Milton Fold, 2 miles S.W. of Whalley

B.

Mire Brook, 2 miles W.N.W. of Middleton

S.

MITTON (Little), the township on the banks of the Ribble, N.E. of Whalley. N.B. Great Mitton is on the north side of the Ribble, in the county of York

B.

Mitton Hall, Little Mitton

B.

Mock Beggar, 3 miles W. of Prescot

W.D.

MONK CONISTON, (Furness) 2 miles W. of Hawkshead

L.

Monk's Hall, near Eccles

S.

Monk's Hall, 31/2 miles E.N.E. of Burnley

B.

Monsall, 21/2 miles E. of Manchester

S.

MONTON, 5 miles W.N.W. of Manchester. Here is a Dissenting chapel, belonging to a respectable congregation of Presbyterians

S.

Moor Edge, near Rivington Pike

S.

Moor End, 11/2 mile S. of Church

B.

Moor Field Hall, 2 miles N.E. of Wigan

S.

Moor Hall, (Low Furness) 1 mile S. of Ulverston

L.

Moor Hall, 31/2 miles W.N.W. of Preston

A.

Moor Hall, 2 miles S.E. of Bury

S.

Moor Head (Higher and Lower), 5 miles S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Moor House, (Furness) 3 miles N.N.W. of Ulverston

L.

Moor House, (Low Furness) 11/2 miles S.W. of Dalton

L.

Moor House, 3 miles N.W. of Ribchester

B.

Moor House, 1 mile N.N.W. of Little Crosby

W.D.

Moor House Fold, Balderston

B.

Moor Side, 11/2 mile N.N.E. of Kirkham

A.

Moor Side, 2 miles N.E. of Lancaster

L.

Moor Side, 3 miles S.S.E. of Lancaster

L.

Moor Side, 5 miles N.N.E. of Lancaster

L.

Moor Yate, 11/2 mile S. of Blackburn

S.

Moor Yeat, 4 miles N.E. of Lancaster

L.

Morley Hall, 11/2 mile S. of Astley Chapel

W.D.

Morrow Leet, 2 miles S.E. of St. Michael's-le-Wyre

A.

Morton, 11/2 mile S.S.E. of Whalley

B.

Moses' Gate, 2 miles S.S.E. of Bolton-le-Moors

S.

Mosey Lee, 2 miles N.W. of Standish

LL.

MOSLEY, 3 miles N.E. of Ashton-under-Line, in which parish this village is situated. It has a handsome chapel of ease; patron, the Rector of Ashton-under-Line. N.B. This place is situated at an angle, where the three counties of York, Chester, and Lancaster come to a point

S.

Mosley, 1 mile N.E. of Lowton chapel

W.D.

Mosley Common, near Ellenbrough Chapel, 3 miles E.S.E. of Chowbent

W.D.

Mosley Hill, 31/2 miles S.E. of Liverpool

W.D.

Moss Bank, 2 miles N. of St. Hellen's

W.D.

Moss Hall, 2 miles S.E. of Bury

S.

Moss Hall, 21/2 miles N.N.E. of Ribchester

B.

Moss House, 2 miles W.N.W. of Standish

LL.

Moss House, 1 mile N.W. of Mawdsley

LL.

Moss House, on the west side of Chat Moss, 21/2 miles W.N.W. of Irlam

S.

Moss House, 1/2 mile S. of Blakely

S.

Moss Houses, (Furness) near Mirkley

L.

Moss Houses, 1 mile S.E. of Pilling chapel

A.

Moss Houses, 2 miles N.N.E. of Colne

B.

Moss Lane, 4 miles S. of Garstang

A.

MOSS SIDE, 11/2 mile S. of Manchester

S.

Moss Side, 1 mile W. of Ashton-under-line

S.

Moss Side, 4 miles N.N.W. of Bury

S.

Moss Side, 2 miles E. of Much Hool

LL.

Moss Side, 11/2 mile N.N.E. of Croston

LL.

Moss Side, 2 miles N. of Chorley

LL.

Moss Side, 11/2 mile S. of Wigan

W.D.

Moss Side, near Great Marton

A.

Moss Vale, 21/2 miles S. of Chipping

B.

Mossborough Hall, 31/2 miles N. of Prescot

W.D.

MOSTON, 4 miles N.E. of Manchester

S.

Moston Hall, 31/2 miles N.E. of Manchester

S.

Moulding Waters, 31/2 miles S. of Blackburn

LL.

Mount, near Lytham

A.

Mount Pleasant, 21/2 miles N. of Bury

S.

Mount Pleasant, 1 mile N. of Manchester

S.

Mount Sion, 4 miles S.W. of Haslingden

B.

Mowbrick Hall, 31/2 miles W.N.W. of Kirkham

A.

MUCH HOOL, 8 miles S.W. of Preston, a parish in the deanry of Blackburn, the living is a rectory; patron - Barton, Esq.

LL.

MUCH URSWICK, (Furness) 21/2 miles E. of Dalton

L.

Mussbury, 2 miles S.W. of Haslingden

B.

Mussbury, 21/2 miles S.S.W. of Haslingden

B.

MYERSCOUGH, the township E. of St. Michaels le Wyer

A.

Myerscough House, 11/2 mile S.S.E. of Garstang Church Town

A.

Mytham, 2 miles E. of Chipping

B.


This gazetteer has been provided by John Turner, Email: JohnMTurner@compuserve.com
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