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Help and advice for Hemingby

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Hemingby

Cemeteries

Census

  • The parish was in the Horncastle sub-district of the Horncastle Registration District.
  • The North Lincolnshire Library holds copies of the census returns for 1841 and 1881.
  • Check our Census Resource page for county-wide resources.
  • The table below gives census piece numbers, where known:
Census
Year
Piece No.
1841 H.O. 107 / 637
1851 H.O. 107 / 2107
1861 R.G. 9 / 2367
1871 R.G. 10 / 3381
1891 R.G. 12 / 2598

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Hemingby area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church History

  • The Anglican parish church is dedicated to Saint Margaret.
  • The parish church was completely rebuilt around 1771 of local stone in the Grecian style and restored in 1895.
  • In 1895 the church tower was rebuilt.
  • The church can seat 148 persons.
  • The church is a Grade II listed structure with English Heritage.
  • A photograph of the Anglican church is at the Richard BROTHWELL Church Photographs site.
  • Stephen McKAY has a photograph of St. Margaret's Church on Geo-graph, taken in December, 2012.
  • Here is a photo of St. Margaret's Church, taken by Ron COLE (who retains the copyright):

St. Margaret's Church

Church Records

  • Parish registers exist from 1579, but I.G.I. extracts go back to 1561.
  • The LFHS has published several marriage indexes for the Horncastle Deanery to make your search easier.
  • The Wesleyan Methodists had a small chapel here prior to 1841, but a new chapel was built in 1859. For information and assistance in researching these chapels, see our non-conformist religions page.
  • J. THOMAS has a photograph of a Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on Geo-graph, taken in September, 2013. It is presumably a private residence now.
  • Check our Church Records page for county-wide resources.

Civil Registration

  • The parish was in the Horncastle sub-district of the Horncastle Registration District.
  • Check our Civil Registration page for sources and background on Civil Registration starting in July 1837.

Description and Travel

Hemingby is both a village and a parish about 4 miles north of Horncastle and 18 miles east of Lincoln. The parish is bordered on the west by the River Bain, on the south by Edlington parish and on the southeast by West Ashby parish. Glouceby parish lies to the north. The parish is in the heart of The Wolds and covers about 2,300 acres. "New End" is a hamlet just south of the village.

Hemingby village sits on a slope above the River Bain. A small rivulet runs through the village on its way to join the Bain. If you are planning a visit:

  • Take the A158 trunk road, which runs between Lincoln and Horncastle, and turn right (east) at Baumber and drive one mile to Hemingby. Alternatively, one can take the A153 north out of Horncastle and turn west after West Ashby to Hemingby village.
  • Check the local Community Website for current activities.
  • Visit our touring page for more sources.
You can see pictures of Hemingby which are provided by:

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Hemingby has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

Ask for a calculation of the distance from Hemingby to another place.

History

  • Janet E. SMITH has a photograph of the Coach and Horses on Geo-graph, taken in June, 2006.
  • These are the names associated with the pub in various directories:
Year  Person
1842 Robt. RHOADES, butcher & vict.
1856 Bryan SMITH, horse breaker & vict.
1871 John BRUMBY, victualler
1882 Mrs. Mildred BRUMBY, victualler
1900 Edward Johnson GRIFFIN
1913 Mrs. Sarah Ann WORSDALL
1930 Thos. RICHARDSON

Land and Property

  • In 1841, Lady Jane BAKER was the principal landowner, but there were many smaller landowners too.
  • In 1872, Miss Trafford SOUTHWELL was the principal landowner, but there were many smaller landowners too.

Maps

  • Maps WorldWide may be able to provide you with a Landranger map of Hemingby. Ask for "Landranger Map 0122: Skegness & Horncastle".
  • See our Maps page for additional resources.
You can see maps centred on OS grid reference TF237744 (Lat/Lon: 53.252186, -0.147338), Hemingby which are provided by:

Military History

  • One son of Hemingby is recorded as a casualty of World War I on the Horncastle War Memorial. It is Private W. CHESELDINE, who died in 1917.

Names, Geographical

  • The village is first recorded as Hamingebi in the 1086 Domesday Book, from the Old Scandinavian Hemingr+by or "farmstead of a man named Hemingr".
    A. D. Mills, "A Dictionary of English Place-Names," Oxford University Press, 1991.
  • The name has also been recorded as "Heningby".

Names, Personal

  • White's 1842 Directory lists the following surnames in the parish: BELTON, BOOTH, BRADER, BURNETT, DRANT, ELSEY, EVISON, FAIRBON, GRAVES, JOHNSON, LANGLEY, LEONARD, MARSHALL, MARWOOD, MERRIKIN, RHOADES, RYLATT, SHIPLAY, STRAWSON, TAYLOR, THACKERHAY, TODD, TURNER and WARD.
  • White's 1872 Directory lists the following surnames in the parish: BARK, BETTS, BOSWELL, BRADER, BRUMBY, COOK, DRANT, DUNCOMBE, EASTGATE, ELSEY, ENGLISH, EVISON, FLECTHER, GELL, GRAVES, HARRISON, HILL, MARSHALL, RYLATT, STRAWSON, SWABEY and THACKERAY.

Politics and Government

  • This place was an ancient parish in Lincoln county and became a modern Civil Parish when those were established.
  • The parish was in the North division of the ancient Gartree Wapentake in the East Lindsey district in the parts of Lindsey.
  • For today's district governance, see the East Lindsey District Council.

Poor Houses, Poor Law etc.

  • Bastardy cases would be heard in the Horncastle petty session hearings every Saturday.
  • A hospital was erected by Mrs. Jane DYMOKE in 1727. She established a yearly allowance for four poor widows of Lincolnshire to abide there. There was a 145 acre farm associated with the hospital for revenue purposes. The four almswomen received a weekly allowance of two shillings and thrupence, plus coal.
  • Kate NICOL has a photograph of the Dymoke Almshouses on Geo-graph, taken in February, 2010.
  • Mrs. DYMOKE's charity also allowed for about four apprentices to be in training in Hemingby at any one time.
  • As a result of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act, the parish became part of the Horncastle Poor Law Union on 16th January 1837.
  • In 1848, Mrs. Jane BAKER left the interest on £500 to be distributed to the poor in coal.
  • In the 1870's, £12 was distributed to the eight boys and girls with the best school attendance record. The award was granted in clothing.

Population

Year  Inhabitants
1801 231
1811 244
1821 297
1831 366
1841 373
1851 407
1871 420
1881 402
1891 401
1901 332
1911 321

Schools

  • A Free School was erected by Mrs. Jane DYMOKE in 1727.
  • A Boys School was erected in 1865 and the Dymoke school became the girls' campus.
  • In 1969 the local village school was closed. It was purchased by the parish in 1974 and converted into a village hall. It is available for hire and has a number of scheduled events.
  • For more on researching school records, see our Schools Research page.