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Balderton

"Balderton is a pleasant and well-built village and parish, 2 miles south-east of Newark, containing 1,048 inhabitants and 4,050 acres of land, at the annual value of £6,930. It was anciently famous for its Lords, the Bussey's, who lived in the Conqueror's time, and whose posterity held it till Queen Elizabeth's reign, after which it descended to the Meers and Lascels. It is now owned principally by the Duke of Newcastle, who is lord of the manor, which was soc to Newark. Matthew Harvey, William Withers and Thomas S. Godfrey Esqrs. also have estates here, the latter of whom built New Hall, a neat mansion, in 1840. The Great Northern Railway intersects the parish. The church, dedicated to St Giles, is a very handsome edifice, principally in the latter style of the English architecture, with a lofty spire and five bells. It has a richly ornamented Norman porch of exceeding beauty, and in good preservation. The benefice is annexed to the vicarage of Farndon. The prebendary of Farndon, in Lincoln Cathedral, is the appropriator, but he and the incumbent received allotments at the enclosure, in 1768, in lieu of all the tithes, except those which are still paid on about 125 acres of crown land. A Methodist chapel was erected here in 1813. An annual feast is held on the first Sunday after September 12th." [WHITE's "Directory of Nottinghamshire," 1853]

Cemeteries

  • The Parish Council's Cemetery has a Garden of Remembrance and is known as Mount Road Cemetery. It has two entrances.
  • There is, on an acre of land next to the Cemetery, somewhat incongruously, the Newark & Sherwood Primary Care Health Centre.
  • The Cemetery was enlarged in 2009, but the new area has not been needed for burials as of 2014.

Census

  • The parish was in the Balderton sub-district of the Newark Registration District.
  • The table below gives census piece numbers, where known:
CensusYear Piece No.
1841 H.O. 107 / 862
1851 H.O. 107 / 2138
1861 R.G. 9 / 2481
1891 R.G. 12 / 2715

Churches

You can also perform a more selective search for churches in the Balderton area that are recorded in the GENUKI church database. This will also help identify other churches in nearby townships and/or parishes. You also have the option to see the location of the churches marked on a map.

Church History

  • There were reports that a Saxon church stood here in 1000 AD, but no traces remain of that structure.
  • The Anglican parish church is dedicated to Saint Giles.
  • The existing church was built around 1154 AD.
  • The tower was added in the 13th century.
  • The church was enlarged in the 13th and 14th centuries.
  • The church was restored in 1881-82.
  • The church seats 400.
  • The church is a Grade I listed building with British Heritage.
  • Mike FORBESTER has a photograph of St. Giles Church on Flickr, taken in August 2002.
  • David DIXON has a photograph of St. Giles Church on Geo-graph, taken in September, 2013.
  • You can visit the St. Giles website to see what is going on at the church these days.

Church Records

  • The Anglican parish registers date from 1538 and are in good condition.
  • The Bishop's Transcripts of those registers dates from 1600 through 1848 and are available on microfilm from the London Family Hisotry Centre.
  • The parish was in the deanery #2 of Newark.
  • The Wesleyan Methodists and Primitive Methodists each had a chapel here in 1813.
  • The Wesleyan Methodists built a new chapel here in 1908.
  • Jonathan THACKER has a photograph of the Methodist Church on Geo-graph, taken in August, 2010.

Civil Registration

  • The parish was in the Balderton sub-district of the Newark Registration District.
  • Civil Registration began in July, 1837.

Description and Travel

Balderton is a village and a parish only 1.75 miles south-east of Newark, 20 miles from Nottingham city and 118 miles north of the city of London. The parish borders on Lincolnshire and covers 3,707 acres.

Balderton village is one of the largest villages in Nottingham and is considered by many to be a suburb of Newark on Trent. If you are planning a visit:

  • The A1 motorway used to run through the village but a modern bypass now skirts the place.
  • The nearest railway stop is Newark.
  • Balderton Lake provides a place to relax and hosts a local fishing club.
  • The Grove Leisure Centre contains two swimming pools.
You can see pictures of Balderton which are provided by:

Directories

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Balderton has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

Ask for a calculation of the distance from Balderton to another place.

Maps

  • See our Maps page for additional resources.
You can see maps centred on OS grid reference SK815515 (Lat/Lon: 53.054532, -0.785495), Balderton which are provided by:

Medical Records

  • The Newark Municipal Isolation Hospital was erected here in 1906 on Barnby Road just north of the village.
  • A new block was added in 1912 with room for 16 more patients.
  • Hospitals were not required to archive patient records, but the Archives should hold administrative, accounting and photographic records. Patient records are protected under Closure regulations.
  • The Hospital closed, now sits unused and is called "The Hollies" by locals.
  • Jonathan THACKER has a photograph of Newark Isolation Hospital on Geo-graph, taken in June, 2010.

Military History

  • David DIXON has a photograph of the War Memorial outside the Methodist Church on Geo-graph, taken in September, 2013.
  • During World War II. the RAF operated out of Balderton starting in 1941. The arifield was closed in 1957. The area is now used as farmland.
  • Sir Frank WHITTLE, inventor of the jet engine, worked on his jet engine designs in Balderton Hall.

Military Records

There has been a project to record the names on the joint Newark and Balderton War Memorial. Most are from Newark, but you can see the results at the Faces to Names site.

Names, Geographical

  • The village appears to be of Anglo-Saxon origin and is mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Book as Baldretune.
  • Locals pronounce the name as "Bollerton".
  • Locals call the A1 road well out of the village towards Grantham the "ramper".

Politics and Government

  • This place was an ancient parish and chapelry in county Nottingham.
  • The parish was in the southern division of the ancient Newark Wapentake (Hundred) in the eastern division of the county.
  • In April, 1935, this Civil Parish ceeded 82 acres to Newark-on-Trent Civil Parish.
  • The parish council meets in the Village Centre on Coronation Street.
  • You may contact the local Balderton Parish Council regarding civic or politcal issues, but they are NOT staffed to help with family history lookups.
  • District governance is provided by the Newark and Sherwood District Council.

Poor Houses, Poor Law etc.

  • Bastardy cases would be heard in the Newark petty session hearings.
  • The Common Land was enclosed here in 1766.
  • After the Poor Law Amendment Act reforms of 1834, the parish became part of the Newark Poor Law Union.
  • The parish became the center of a sub-district for the Newark Poorlaw Union.
  • Some Poorlaw records and Bastardy Bonds for this parish are available on microfilm at the London Family History Centre.
  • In 1892, Miss ALice BAKEWELL founded six almshouses to accomodate two couple and 4 individuals in need.

Population

Year Inhabitants
1801 636
1811 659
1831 830
1841 899
1851 1,048
1871 1,009
1881 1,075
1891 1,404
1901 2,203
1911 2,824

Schools

  • A local School Board was formed 1871.
  • A National School was built here in 1846, but had been founded in 1726 by WIlliam ALVEY.
  • Around 1900 a senior school was opened on Main Street and a primary school on London Road opened in 1903.
  • Chuter Ede is a primary school which opened in 1964 on main Street and moved to Wofit Avenue in 1967.
  • The Grove School provides secondary education to eleven to eighteen year-olds as a science college.