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Help and advice for HATFIELD: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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HATFIELD: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

"HATFIELD, a parish, township, and large village in the S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Thorpe, and 7 N.E. of Doncaster. It is situated on the Doncaster road, near the navigable river Don, and the canal which passes through the township of Stainforth. A battle is said to have taken place here between Ceadwalla and Penda on the one side, and Edwin, king of Northumbria, on the other, in which the latter, with his son Osfrid, were slain. On the heath numerous relics have been found, which are preserved in the church. The parish, which formed part of Hatfield Chase before it was drained by Vermuyden, in Charles I.'s time, includes the large villages of Hatfield, Hatfield Wood, and Stainforth, besides 7 hamlets It was formerly of larger extent than at present, comprising the parish of Thorne, and nearly the whole of the Chase. The soil is sandy, with clay and black peat in parts, resting on a subsoil of gravel and clay. The chief crops are turnips, barley, oats, and wheat, with some good pasture and moss. The population are chiefly engaged in agriculture, and have been decreasing of late years. The village, which is very considerable, contains three good inns. Petty sessions are held at the "Blue Bell" fortnightly. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of York, value £170, in the patronage of Lord Lauderdale and the Hon. Mr. Coventry. The church, dedicated to St. Laurence, is a cruciform structure with a square embattled tower rising from the intersection of the nave and transepts, and crowned with pinnacles. The register dates from 1579. There are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists. There are two National schools and Sunday-schools. H. C. M. Ingram, Esq., is lord of the manor. The old house in which William de Hatfield, son of Edward III., was born, is at present occupied by R. Heathcote, Esq."


"BEARSWOOD GREEN, a hamlet in the parish of Hatfield, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, 2 miles to the S. W. of Thorn."


"DUNSCROFT, a hamlet in the township and parish of Hatfield, in the West Riding of the county of York, 3 miles S.W. of Thorpe. There was formerly a small cell here to the abbey of Roche."


"GATEWOOD, a hamlet in the township and parish of Hatfield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Thorne."


"HIGH LEVELS, (and Low Levels), hamlets in the parish of Hatfield, wapentake of South Strafforth, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Thorpe. These hamlets are situated at a short distance from the river Don, near Hatfield Chase."


"LINGS, a hamlet in the township and parish of Hatfield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Thorpe."


"PARKS, a hamlet in the township and parish of Hatfield, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Thorne."


"SAND BRAMWITH, (or South Bramwith), a hamlet in the township of Stainforth, and parish of Hatfield, wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, in the West Riding of the county of York, close to Kirk Bramwith."


"STAINFORTH, a township in the parish of Hatfield, S. division of Strafforth wapentake, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Thorne, and 2 from Hatfield. It is a station on the South Yorkshire and Lincolnshire railway. The village, which is chiefly agricultural, is situated on the river Don, near its communication with the Keadby canal. There are bridges over the river and canal; and on the latter, which is only 15 miles long, is a spacious quay. A portion of the inhabitants are employed in boat-building. There is a chapel-of-ease to Hatfield, and chapels for Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and Unitarians. The charities produce about £4 per annum."


"TUDWORTH, a hamlet in the parish of Hatfield, West Riding county York, 2 miles S. of Thorne."


"WOODHOUSE, (or Hatfield Woodhouse), a village in the parish of Hatfield, wapentake of Strafforth, West Riding county York, 3 miles S.W. of Thorne, and 7 N.E. of Doncaster, near the navigable river Don."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013