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Tregony

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1868 - The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland

"TREGONY, a parish and town in the W. division of Powder hundred, county Cornwall, 3 miles from Grampound, and 10 S.W. of Bodmin. It is situated on the river Fal, which was once wide and deep, but is now obstructed by the accumulation of sand and rubbish. The original town, situated at the base of the hill on which the present is built, occupied the site of the Roman Cenin, or Voluba, and belonged to the Earl of Mortaigne at the time of the Domesday survey. The manor afterwards came to the Pomeroys, Boscawens of Tregothnan, and Bassets. The present town, which has been lessened in importance since the increase of Truro, consists of one principal street, forming part of the road from St. Austell to St. Mawes. It is a petty sessions town and decayed borough, having been incorporated by James I. in 1620, and returned two members to parliament from Edward I.'s time until disfranchised by the Reform Act. In the vicinity are traces of a castle, supposed to have been erected in the reign of Richard I. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the copper and tin works. The living is a rectory with the vicarage of Cuby, in the diocese of Exeter, value £311. The church is dedicated to St. James. The parochial charities produce about £72 per annum. There is a National school for both sexes. The Independents, Wesleyans, and Bible Christians have chapels. Fairs are held on Shrove Tuesday, 3rd of May, 25th July, 1st September, and 6th November."