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Basingstoke

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"BASINGSTOKE, a parish, market-town, and municipal borough, in the hundred of Basingstoke-Infra-Hundred, in the county of Southampton, 19 miles to the N.E. of Winchester, 46 miles to the S.W. of London by the old road, and 48 by railway. It is a station on the London and South-Western railway, and is connected with the Great Western railway by a branch line from Reading. Basingstoke is a very ancient town, being referred to in Domesday Book as a royal manor, which had never paid tax or been distributed into hides, with the privilege of a market worth 30s. It is there named Basingtoches. The conjecture that at an earlier period the town was of inferior rank to Basing is founded on the addition "stoke" signifying hamlet. It is seated in a fertile and beautiful country, with fine woods and rich pasture land, near the source of the river Loddon, which flows by the town, and is called the Town Brook. "

[From The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868) - transcribed by Colin Hinson ©2003]

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Cemeteries

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Churches

There are more than 30 churches identified in this place. Please click here for a complete list.
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Description & Travel

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Gazetteers

1868 - The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland

"BASINGSTOKE, a parish, market-town, and municipal borough, in the hundred of Basingstoke-Infra-Hundred, in the county of Southampton, 19 miles to the N.E. of Winchester, 46 miles to the S.W. of London by the old road, and 48 by railway. It is a station on the London and South-Western railway, and is connected with the Great Western railway by a branch line from Reading. Basingstoke is a very ancient town, being referred to in Domesday Book as a royal manor, which had never paid tax or been distributed into hides, with the privilege of a market worth 30s. It is there named Basingtoches. The conjecture that at an earlier period the town was of inferior rank to Basing is founded on the addition "stoke" signifying hamlet. It is seated in a fertile and beautiful country, with fine woods and rich pasture land, near the source of the river Loddon, which flows by the town, and is called the Town Brook.

The houses are well built, the streets paved and lighted with gas, and there is a good supply of water. The trade of the town has long been extensive and flourishing, owing, in great measure, to its situation at the junction of four railways, and the meeting of five important roads. The woollen manufacture was at one time carried on here, and the place obtained a name for its druggets and shalloons; but this manufacture is almost extinct. Its chief trade now is in corn, malt, coal, and timber, the facilities for carrying on which are materially increased by its having a ready communication with London by means of the Basingstoke canal and the Barks and Hants canal, besides the South Western and Great Western railways. Here is an extensive brewery and foundry.

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Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Basingstoke has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

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History

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Maps

You can see maps centred on OS grid reference SU623514 (Lat/Lon: 51.258121, -1.108976), Basingstoke which are provided by:

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Societies

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