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KILHAM: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1868.

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"KILHAM, a parish in the wapentake of Dickering, East Riding county York, 6 miles N.E. of Driffield, its post town, and 8 S.W. of Bridlington. It is situated on the Wolds, at the head of the river Hull, which has its source in this parish. It was formerly a market town, but is now only a small village consisting of one straggling street of about 1 mile in length. The land is chiefly arable, and the soil various, with about 350 acres of woodland. There is a large brewery, and bricks are made here. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment under an Enclosure Act in 1771. At Hempit Hole is a remarkable intermittent spring, and near the Rudston road is a mineral spring. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of York, value £300, in the patronage of the archbishop. The church, dedicated to All Saints, is an ancient stone building with a massive square tower, strengthened with angular buttresses, and containing a clock and three bells. In the church are a Norman doorway, sedilia, and piscina. There are several tablets to the Anderson, Thompson, and other families. The charities produce £38 per annum, of which £30 goes to the support of D'Arcy's grammar school, founded in 1633. The Wesleyans, Baptists, and Primitive Methodists have each a place of worship, and there are National schools for both sexes; also a mechanics' institute, with library. W. S. D. Duesbery, Esq., is lord of the manor. Fairs are held on the 21st August and 12th November for cattle."

[Transcribed from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland 1868]
by Colin Hinson ©2013