Hide

Bower

hide
Hide

"BOWER, a parish in the county of Caithness, Scotland, 10 miles to the N.W. of Wick. It is situated on the coast of the North Sea, near Dunnet Head. The surface is irregular, and partly under cultivation. Its highest point is at Heather Cow Cairn, from which there is a good prospect. There are two small lochs. The living, worth £191, is in the presbytery of Caithness, in the patronage of Sir James Colquhoun, Bart. There is also a Free church. Stone Lude, or Lutt, about 8 feet high, stands on a hill, and is considered a Scandinavian relic. Several cairns exist in the neighbourhood."

Description(s) from The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland (1868)

Hide
topup

Churches

Presbyterian / Unitarian
Bower, Church of Scotland
topup

Description and Travel

You can see pictures of Bower which are provided by:

topup

Gazetteers

1851 - Topographical Dictionary of Scotland, Samuel Lewis

BOWER, a parish, in the county of Caithness, 11 miles (S. E. by E.) from Thurso, and the same distance (N. W.) from Wick; containing 1689 inhabitants. This place is said to derive its name from a Danish word signifying " a valley ", and the application of the term to this locality seems to be by no means inappropriate. The parish is about twelve miles long, and four broad, and the surface is in general low and flat, being diversified only by a ridge of green hills, of small elevation, running from north to south, through the whole. On an eminence in this ridge is a large perpendicular stone called Stone Lude or Lutt, supposed to mark the sepulchre of some Danish or Norwegian chief who fell here. The soil of the arable land consists mostly of strong clay and loam, and the subsoil is clay; in some of the hollows and valleys a fine rich marl is obtained in great abundance, and extensively and very beneficially used as manure. The parish is altogether agricultural and pastoral: the recent prevalence of sheep-farming has diminished the importance of the former branch, and given to the latter a decided predominance. Grain and live stock are frequently sent to the south, being shipped at Wick by steamers or trading vessels. The annual value of real property in the parish is £4300. The rocks are of the primitive class; a vein of copper was discovered some time ago, but was never worked. Barrack House and Stempster House, both of them modern edifices; Stanstill; and Tister, are the principal residences. The population is scattered among the rural districts: of late years, many, in consequence of the expulsion of agricultural labourers by the extensive introduction of sheep-farming, have been driven to the moors, or to seek a livelihood in foreign lands. Four annual fairs are held here, namely, Campster fair, on the Tuesday after St. Patrick's day; Lyth fair, on the second Tuesday of October; St. Maud's, on the second Tuesday in November (all O.

topup

Historical Geography

You can see the administrative areas in which Bower has been placed at times in the past. Select one to see a link to a map of that particular area.

topup

Maps

You can see maps centred on OS grid reference ND236618 (Lat/Lon: 58.53751, -3.314604), Bower which are provided by:

topup

Societies

  • The Caithness Family History Society covers this county.
  • The Highland Family History Society covers this county.
  • The Highland Family History Society is based at the Highland Archive and Registration Centre at Bught Park, Inverness.